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Leonard Nimoy Dead at 83, Played Star Trek's Iconic and Beloved Mr. Spock

Star Trek icon Leonard Nimoy died at his Los Angeles home on Friday after a battle with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, his wife Susan tells the New York Times. He was 83. In addition to playing the U.S.S. Enterprises Vulcan science officer Mr. Spock on the original Star Trek series and its six big-screen continuances, []

Weekend Binge Guide: January 2015

Have the weekend free? Going out is overrated! Binge-watch one of these shows instead:   If you want to laugh:   Brooklyn Nine-Nine See all reviews for Brooklyn Nine-Nine In catching up with this show the other day, I announced to the world that I thought Brooklyn Nine-Nine  was the legitimate heir to the glory that was  NewsRadio . I'm sorry if you're unfamiliar with  NewsRadio , but basically, it was the best workplace comedy of the '90s (#90skid) and it was filled with wonderful, uniquely hilarious characters.  Brooklyn Nine-Nine  is the same — except with guns!       If you want to cry:   Bunheads See all reviews for Bunheads This quiet tragicomedy lasted only one terrific season, but that's no reason you shouldn't watch it. From the mind behind  Gilmore Girls  (and with some of the same cast),  Bunheads  follows Michelle (Broadway vet Sutton Foster) from Las Vegas to the sleepy California town of Paradise, where she ends up co-directing a dance studio with her mother-in-law after SPOILER SPOILER SPOILER. It sounds insufferable, I know, but it's really just a delightful trifle that has the ability to break your heart once an episode.     If you want to scream:   Fringe See all reviews for  Fringe Take it from an expert: Do not watch  Fringe  while eating. Giant worms erupt from (living) bodies, people disintegrate/explode, and well, it's just gross a lot of the time! But it was also one of the more fully-realized sci-fi serials of the last decade. It's a marriage of monsters, technology, transhumanism, and parallel worlds — and what  doesn't  sound fun about that? Oh, right, the giant worms and exploding bodies. But that's what you're looking for, right?      If you want to think:   Louie See all reviews for  Louie If you think  Louie  is a comedy, you're... half right. It has comedic elements, sure, and it's based on Louis C.K.'s standup, but it's really more of an exploration of humanity, and one that gets exceedingly dark at times. It plays with form, eschewing the hypercontintinuity of most millennial series, and each episode feels more like a miniature film thesis than a standard sitcom. It attacks existentialism, suicide, aging, and insecurity, and it sets the standard for quality in a way that most "serious" shows would kill for.     Leah E. Friedman  is the editor of You can follow her musings on  Twitter .

SideReel Salutes Dads

Dads are pretty great, right? (Right.) Your dad is probably the coolest person you know! TV dads are a totally different deal, though. They run the gamut from the platonic ideal to the complete nightmare. In honor of Father's Day, SideReel's taking a moment to honor iconic TV dads, from the sublime (Uncle Phil) to the terrifying (Tony Soprano). Check out our list and then thank your lucky stars Tobias Fünke wasn't your role model.   King of the Hill : Hank Hill King of the Hill was probably the most naturalistic cartoon ever to grace the screen, and Hank Hill was its standard-bearer. As head of the household, he strove to be unambiguously normal, despite Bobby and Peggy's needs to stand out. His own father, Cotton, was everything he couldn't stand (profane, misogynistic, racist, and... well... shinless), and so, though he never quite understood Bobby, he always, always supported him—except when it came to Dog Dancing . That was every man for himself.     Friday Night Lights : Eric Taylor As James Poniewozik, Time 's television critic, once wrote , Kyle Chandler's portrayal of Coach Eric Taylor was "the How to Be a God Damn Man seminar." And really, it was. Though understated, Coach is fiercely loyal to his family (yes, even awful Julie), and also serves as a surrogate father to what seems like half of the football players in Dillon. He handles every obstacle with aplomb, and has already taken his place among the pantheon of perfect TV dads.       Arrested Development : Tobias Fünke And then there's Tobias Fünke. Both flamboyant and repressed, his self-absorbed whims are a perfect fit for the bizarre antics of his in-laws. He veers between forgetting he has a daughter and yearning for her respect—and in trying to achieve it uses means so totally repulsive, he only manages to drive her further away. Luckily for Maeby, raising oneself is probably better than being raised by a Never-Nude.       The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air : Uncle Phil There is a generation out there (and I know it, because it's mine) that wanted nothing more than to be Will Smith in The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air —and it had nothing to do with being able to perform the theme song. No, it was all thanks to Uncle Phil, the only real father-figure Will ever had, and the man who comforted him when he was rejected by his biological father. Tough yet fair, Uncle Phil knew when to indulge his family and when to tighten the reins, and, judging by the reactions to actor James Avery's death, Phil was inspirational in his approach to parenting.     Seinfeld : Morty Seinfeld Come on, the man owns a shirt that says "Number 1 Dad." So much of the time when talking about fathers on Seinfeld , we focus on Frank Costanza, but Barney Martin's Morty Seinfeld was a terrific addition to the ensemble in his own right. As vain and spite-driven as his son, he had dreams of political dominance (in the rarefied world of Miami old-person condo associations) and saw such a strong legacy in his invention of the beltless trenchcoat ("The Executive") that he derailed a chartered trip to Paris. Besides, his devotion to the Early Bird special rivals that of his devotion to his son, so we'd be remiss if we didn't mention him.     The Cosby Show : Cliff Huxtable Cliff Huxtable was probably the defining TV dad (and pudding pitchman) of the 1980s. His perfect, sweetly funny, be-sweatered family was the envy of America, and, per TV Guide , "single-handedly revived the sitcom genre." In the days of very-special-episode comedy, Cliff Huxtable was king of his fictional castle, and Bill Cosby was the king of the medium.       The Sopranos : Tony Soprano Premiering at the very tail-end of the '90s (seriously, it premiered January '99), The Sopranos launched the anti-hero-driven dramas of the 2000s, and Tony Soprano, effortlessly played by James Gandolfini, was the anti-hero of our time. Patriarch of the Sopranos and the DiMeo organization, Tony's life in both was complicated enough to spawn the brilliant first season tagline "If one family doesn't kill him, the other will."       Fringe : Walter Bishop Dr. Walter Bishop: actual genius, criminal genius, lover of hallucinogens, and father to two universes' worth of Peter Bishop. This is a man who crossed dimensional barriers to rescue his double's dying boy in order to save himself from despair. This act of fatherly love would be the catalyst for gruesome trans-universal crimes against humanity, a dimensional war, and a pretty damn bleak future, but he never regrets saving his son. Besides, all that LSD he ingested probably took the sting out of it.     Leah E. Friedman  is the editor of Her dad taught her everything she knows. You can follow her musings on  Twitter .

Exclusive: Fringe's Lance Reddick Heads to The Blacklist

  Lance Reddick has landed a guest-starring role on NBC's The Blacklist , has learned exclusively. The Fringe alum will play...

Lance Reddick is "Voodoo Satan!" Fringe Veteran Books New Role on American Horror Story Coven!

Lance Reddick is "Voodoo Satan!" Fringe Veteran Books New Role on American Horror Story Coven! When American Horror Story: Coven returns with new episodes this January, it will be time to unveil more secrets behind the mysterious voodoo witch, Marie Laveau. Fringe alum Lance Reddick has been added to the cast, and his character has an evil (satanic, even) connection to Angela Bassett's character.

Fringe's J.H. Wyman Discusses Series Finale, Teases New Series Almost Human

Fringe fans who are still mourning the loss of their beloved drama will get some solace this fall when executive producer J.H. Wyman 's new drama Almost Human bows in November. But took some time Friday before the series' Comic-Con panel to chat about Fringe 's swan song one last time. Get the latest news from Comic-Con In the series finale...

FRINGE: Lance Reddick on the Enduring Fanbase and What He Wishes He Could Have Done As Broyles

It’s been more than five months since FRINGE ended, but much of the fanbase is still mourning the unique series. When I caught up with Lance Reddick at last month’s Saturn Awards — which he also hosted! — we spoke about the enduring fanbase, what he wishes he had been able to do as Broyles, [...]

FRINGE: Anna Torv on Winning Another Saturn Award, the Cut Etta/Olivia Finale Scene, and More

FRINGE star Anna Torv (Olivia) has taken a little bit of a break in the five months since her show ended its run on Fox, but she did make an appearance at last week’s Saturn Awards — where a glowing Torv just happened to pick up her fourth consecutive award for Best Actress. After Torv [...]

Emmys 2013: 13 TV shows likely to be overlooked

Since the Emmy ballots have been sent out to voters, the entertainment world is busy speculating about which shows will get Emmy nominations in 2013. But what about the many deserving shows that will most likely be ignored? Every year, plenty of television programs fail to get any Emmy love. From "Psych" to "Hannibal" to "Fringe," here are 13 of the biggest errors the Emmy voters of 2013 are about to make.Last-minute disqualification: "Orphan Black" Were it not for Tatiana Maslany's surprise win at the Critics' Choice Awards, this BBC America wouldn't even be on anyone's radar. It's still a long-shot. 13. "Raising Hope" For three seasons, this comedy about five generations of a love, blue-collar family is as sweet as it is insanely funny. The acting is uniformly good -- even baby Hope is entertaining -- and the humor of everyday life never gets old. Cloris Leachman and Martha Plimpton have both been...

'Fringe's' Lance Reddick Heads to FX's 'Wilfred' (Exclusive)

He'll guest star in a third-season episode of the Jason Gann-Elijah Wood comedy.