News for


'The Simpsons': Nancy Cartwright on the origin of 'Eat my shorts'

One of Bart Simpson's most famous catchphrases didn't originate with "The Simpsons" writers, but with the voice of Bart herself.Nancy Cartwright says Bart's "Eat my shorts!" outburst "was an ad-lib" at a table read early in the life of the series. "I don't know -- it just occurred to me," she says in the clip below, which is part of a much longer interview at site is part of the Archive of American Television, which does long-form interviews with performers, producers, writers and executives spanning the history of TV.Cartwright explains that "Eat my shorts" was something she and her high school marching band cohorts occasionally chanted when they were goofing around. It stuck in her mind, it got a big laugh from the writers, and a catchphrase was born. Cartwright also talks about the give-and-take between cast members and writers and how ad-libs like her now-legendary one can make it into the script. Take...

THE SIMPSONS “Treehouse of Horror XXII” Season 23 Episode 3

THE SIMPSONS  “Treehouse of Horror  XXII” Season 23 Episode 3  airs Sunday  October 30 (8:00-8:30 PM ET/PT) on FOX. Episode Synopsis:  In the 22nd annual installment of “Treehouse of Horror,” Homer channels Aron Ralston (guest voicing as himself) after a boulder traps his arm; a venomous spider bite leaves Homer paralyzed; then Ned Flanders, devout preacher by day, transforms into a cold-blooded vigilante by night; and Bart and Milhouse get caught in inter-planetary warfare in the all-new “Treehouse of HorrorXXII” episode of THE SIMPSONS airing Sunday, Oct. 30 (8:00-8:30 PM ET/PT) on FOX. Read More...

'The Simpsons: Treehouse of Horror' offers ghoulish fun

It wouldn't be a Halloween without "The Simpsons: Treehouse of Horror." And while the 22nd iteration of the series doesn't hold a candle to some of the great ones of the past - Homer in 3D, The Raven and The Shining - there were a couple of moments worthy of note.Perhaps the best part is in the second segment that's a send up of "Dexter." And who would be the least likely to be a serial killer who is out to do some good? Why it's Ned Flanders, of course. The opening sequence is outstanding and later in the sketch, there's an unexpected visitor we haven't seen in a while.The opening piece is a rather forgettable number. But the show closes strong for anyone who is a fan of "Avatar."One glaring oversight was the absence of Kang and Kodos. They worked in lookalikes, but we fans demand the real thing....

Bart Turns Into Avatar in New Clip of 'The Simpsons' Halloween Episode

In a sneak peek for a 'Treehouse of Horror XXII' sketch called 'In the Na'Vi', Bart turns into a one-eyed creature and boasts about facing his bullies with his new body.

Sneak Peek: 'The Simpsons' Takes On 'Avatar' and More in 'Treehouse of Horror 22'

It's that wonderful time of the year: 'The Simpsons' is celebrating Halloween. In the 22nd annual 'Treehouse of Horror,' our favorite Springfield residents spoof '127 Hours,' 'Avatar,' and many more pop culture phenomenons. Check out Fox's official description and posters for the event below.

New 'The Simpsons' Promo Celebrates Its Two-Season Renewal

Featuring a new version of song 'They'll Never Stop The Simpsons', the newly released video introduces the Simpson clan as the family that doesn't know the meaning of the word 'canceled'.

'The Simpsons' renewed for two more seasons

Don't worry, "Simpsons" fans - the longest-running comedy in TV history is coming back for at least two more seasons.News has been swirling about a possible of cancelation of "The Simpsons" due to budget concerns, but apparently the cast has agreed to a pay cut, as FOX has officially announced two more seasons of the animated program.Season 24 and 25 will see the show broadcast a historical 500th episode. By the time Season 25 has aired, the episode total will be up to 559. The show will return for all-new episodes on Sunday, Oct. 30 with the annual "Treehouse of Horror" episode.In "Treehouse" XXII, Homer takes a dangerous dive into an isolated canyon on Candy Peak, which will feature venomous spider bites, a cold-blooded vigilante and an "Avatar" send-up for Bart and Milhouse. "The Simpsons" airs Sunday nights at 8 p.m. ET/PT on FOX....

'The Simpsons' cast reportedly agrees to pay cut, show will keep going

The cast of "The Simpsons" is nearing a deal that would cut their salaries but ensure that the show will stay on the air past this season.There's no official word on a deal yet, but according to The Hollywood Reporter, cast members Nancy Cartwright, Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner, Hank Azaria, Yeardley Smith and Harry Shearer are close to a deal that reduce their salaries and allow the series -- the longest-running scripted show ever in primetime -- to continue."Simpsons" producer 20th Century Fox TV had demanded the actors take a 45 percent cut from their $400,000-plus per episode salaries to about $250,000 per episode (which would still put the cast in the upper echelon of TV pay). The HR says the actual cuts will be somewhat smaller than the studio initially asked.The new deals will not, however, include any back-end profit participation for the cast beyond their standard residuals. Shearer said earlier Friday (Oct. 7)...

'The Simpsons': Studio gives actors an ultimatum, producers take pay cuts

Time is apparently running short to extend the life of "The Simpsons."Negotiations between producer 20th Century Fox TV and the principal cast have reached the point that, according to The Wrap, the studio has issued an ultimatum: Voice actors Dan Castellaneta, Nancy Cartwright, Julie Kavner, Yeardley Smith, Hank Azaria and Harry Shearer have to respond to 20th's demands by noon Friday (Oct. 7) if the show is to continue past this season.The studio wants the actors to cut their salaries by about 45 percent, from about $440,000 per episode apiece to $250,000 per episode. It's already rejected an offer from the cast to take pay cuts of 30 percent in exchange for a small piece of the show's "back-end" profits -- syndication, DVD sales, merchandising and the like.Meanwhile, Variety reports that several top-level "Simpsons" producers have offered to cut their own salaries in an effort to keep the series going beyond this season. That likely...

Are 'The Simpsons' worth more cancelled?

We all remember Max Bialystock's (arguably) brilliant plan in "The Producers." If done correctly, a massive Broadway flop can be worth more than a hit. In light of recent news that "The Simpsons" may becancelled if its cast does not take a significant pay cut, the old Bialystock model bears examination. No one is accusing Fox of trying to make a quick buck; in fact, Fox is "hopeful that [they] can reach an agreement with the voice cast that allows 'The Simpsons' to go on entertaining audiences with original episodes for many years to come." However, an interesting analysis by Deadline Hollywood points out that "The Simpsons" cash cow may net Fox more if it gets the axe, thus freeing it for new syndication rights.You've seen the endless "Simpsons" re-runs on Fox and Fox affiliates. And you've watched them -- that's why they're worth so much. But the show is currently tied to a syndication deal that is exclusive...