'American Horror Story': Who was in the black rubber suit?

"American Horror Story," which premiered Wednesday night to about 3.2 million viewers (2.03 million in the key Adults 18-49 demographic), is overflowing with weirdness, unanswered questions and dangling bits of depravity.But, we can give you an answer on one little bit -- just who was inside the full-body black "bondage suit" during the pivotal sex scene with former "Friday Night Lights" star Connie Britton.Connie's character, Vivien Harmon, assumed it was her husband, psychiatrist Ben (Dylan McDermott), from whom she has been estranged since a family tragedy and his infidelity."It was supposed to be that she's become a cold fish, and she's not interested in having sex," Britton tells Zap2it. "She turned off her body, because she cannot sleep with this man who did this thing to her. It's very specific. It's not that she doesn't want to have sex ... that might be something that's specific to a woman's body, but I think, honestly, men...

'American Horror Story' has a decent start for FX

FX's new series "American Horror Story" scared up pretty decent ratings for its premiere. About 3.2 million people watched the series premiere Wednesday night (Oct. 5), and just over 2 million of those viewers fell in the adults 18-49 demographic. The 18-49 figure puts it on par with the premiere of "AHS" co-creator Ryan Murphy's last FX show, "Nip/Tuck."Two replays later in the night pushed the premiere's cumulative total to 5 million viewers and 3.2 million adults 18-49."We're really thrilled by the premiere ratings performance of 'American Horror Story,'" FX president and general manager John Landgraf says. "We know that when the Live+7 ratings come in ... 'AHS' will rank at least number two all-time [among FX dramas] in adults 18-49 behind 'The Shield,' and there is a possibility that it could be our highest ever."Also of note: On a channel whose other dramas tend to snare more male than female viewers, "American Horror Story"...

American Horror Story Premieres to Strong Ratings

American Horror Story did not scare away any viewers last night. Quite the opposite in fact. The eerie FX drama premiered to a total of five million viewers, with 3.2 tuning in for the original airing at 10 p.m. and encore telecasts adding a couple more. “We’re really thrilled by the premiere ratings performance of American Horror Story,” FX president John Landgraf said in a statement. “We know that when the Live+7 ratings come in, that of the 13 drama series FX has premiered, AHS will rank at least No. 2 all-time in Adults 18-49 behind The Shield , and there is a possibility that it could be our highest ever.” That honor currently belongs to Justified . Did you watch the pilot? What did you think?

'American Horror Story': Ben Gets a Warning About the House He'll Surely Ignore (VIDEO)

After much anticipation, 'American Horror Story' (Wed., 10PM ET on FX) finally premiered, and it's about as twisted, convoluted and bizarre as you could hope. Creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk seem to be happy to have returned to FX, where they created 'Nip/Tuck.' 'AHS' brings plenty of sex appeal with its horror, which has elements of 'The Shining' and other psychological horrors. Thankfully, they don't appear to have gone the slasher route with this one, preferring to do a lot of their work in the dark and in the mind.

American Horror Story: Connie Britton Answers the Premiere's Burning Questions!

[WARNING: The following story contains spoilers from the premiere of American Horror Story . Read at your own risk.] So now you know what that creepy Rubber Man was doing on the posters for FX's American Horror Story . Give a squeal for Vivien's (very likely) baby daddy! spoke to series star Connie Britton about the burning questions that linger from Wednesday's premiere, the show's planned two-part Halloween frightfest and what more viewers can expect from the deliciously sick and twisted minds of creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk :

'American Horror Story' postmortem: What's in Connie Britton's oven?

Tearful self-pleasure, S&M ghosts, demonic basement gremlins... And you probably thought we were exaggerating in detailing the bonkers-craziness of "American Horror Story." The first outing of Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk's ode to the genre is officially out of the can, and it probably has viewers divided -- but, we're guessing, a little curious too. There's a lot in the pot on "Story," and of the umpteen cliffhangers, none seems as relevant as the presumed evil ghost-baby growing inside Vivien Harmon (Connie Britton). After all, the pseudo-spoiler is the unsubtle subject of the series' creeptastic ad campaign.Does that make her, and the entire family, doomed? We hope not. Aside from the thus-far unappealing Ben (Dylan McDermott), they seem like a family worth rooting for. But the series' seems to make it clear there's no escaping this haunted house.The other main characters seem safe, probably because they're all supernaturally tied to the house themselves. How...

Consider Yourself Warned: Five Ways 'American Horror Story' Will Be a Train Wreck

You've probably heard some buzz about 'American Horror Story' (10PM ET Wednesday, FX), the new drama from 'Glee's' Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk. That's not surprising; if there's one thing Murphy is good at, it's creating shocking moments that the media likes to gab about. The thing is, that may be the only he's good at any more. It's not that 'American Horror Story' 100 percent awful, though at times it veers dangerously close to that. But longtime Murphy watchers know that it's only a matter of time before the few promising elements are clobbered to death by the dumb moves his shows inevitably pull. If you do get pulled in by the show's wildly uneven premiere, trust me, in time, you are bound to be disappointed. Let me count the ways:

American Horror Story Sneak Peek: The First Five Minutes

American Horror Story premieres this Wednesday with a creepy pilot that introduces viewers to the Harmons, a dysfunctional couple played by Connie Britton and Dylan McDermott. We'll also meet the pair's daughter and creepy neighbor, along with the haunted out at the center of this new FX drama. What is its history? Why does a young girl warn everyone who enters that they're "gonna die in there?" The mysteries will start to unfold this week, and, below, you can actually sit back and watch the opening five minutes of the premiere. It takes us back to 1978.

'American Horror Story' Unleashes Creepy and Mysterious Opening Credits

Another  sneak   peek  to " American Horror Story " is released to tease viewers how scary the new series is. The opening credits sequence to the Ryan Murphy-created show, which makes its way out via Entertainment Weekly , is filled with cuts of scenes from a dark basement, featuring creepy stuffs like old photos, fetus in jars and skulls among others.  "The title sequence is almost like a mystery," Murphy explains. "By the time you see the ninth episode of this season, every image in that title sequence will be explained. So for example, 'What are the jars in the basement? What is the mystery of the floating white Christening dress? Why is somebody holding hedge clippers that are bloody?' Each time you watch it and you watch the week's episode you'll be able to say, 'Oh that's why that's in there!' "  Read More...

'American Horror Story' episode 2: highlights from the screening, Q&A

My general impressions of "American Horror Story" episode 2, followed by highlights from the post-screening Q&A session with co-creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk ("Glee", Nip/Tuck").