Prison Break Season 4 Episode 4: Eagles and Angels

If you're willing to accept what you see without too much questioning, I'm sure you will thoroughly enjoy this episode of Prison Break, and the rest of the season. I personally am torn. Do I block out the all those awkward questions surrounding Prison Break, and continue to watch accepting that "hey it's a TV show, it's not suppose to be realistic"? Or do I demand more from my viewing experience? Do I want believable and credible storylines? Or do I just want to be entertained? These are questions viewers will have to ask themselves, and have had to ask themselves, when watching Prison Break.


Take the main storyline of this week's episode: Michael, Lincoln and Mahone have to go to a Police charity event disguised as Policemen, and plant a device which will record all of the information of a Scylla card that is being carried by the Turkish Ambassador's wife. On the one hand "Great! Michael and Lincoln dressed as Police, getting another Scylla card, with the threat of being caught all around them" On the other hand...

Why would they send Michael and Lincoln, the two most wanted men in America, to the function? Why not send Bellick, Roland, Sara or Mahone? Why not get Agent Self to go himself? Why would no police office recognise them? Why would the ambassador's wife carry the Scylla card in her handbag?? And how, once again, does Lincoln survive when a member of the Company has him at gunpoint?


And I know, I know, you can find answers to these questions. Personally I feel that if you've gotten this far with Prison Break, stuff like this no longer bothers you. I know that's how I feel. But it's still frustrating, when little to no attempt is made to make things seem plausible. And it pains me to think that they make the effort to show the group break in and steal LA Police badges, a tiny detail in their plan. The writers are willing to address this issue, but ignore all of the other more pressing concerns with their plan.


OK so enough with my gripes about realism. In this episode we see T-Bag begin work at the job intended for Whistler, and Shannon Lucio (who among other things, has previously starred in The O.C.) makes another appearance as a receptionist, and it seems that her character may well develop into a love interest for T-Bag later in the season. We also see the brothers catch sight of T-Bag in a moment reminiscent of Season 2 Episode 5, when the brothers by chance stumble across T-Bag trying to get the map to find Westmoreland's cash. It seems that T-Bag at some point in the future is going to cross paths with the Company, which is sure to be interesting. Will the enlist his help to take down the Brothers?


Also in this episode we get a glimpse at two storylines that will develop later in the season. First we see Gretchen, who is being held and tortured by the Company, on the verge of freeing herself. Gretchen has done very little thus far this season, but as her name still appears in the opening credits, one assumes she will retain a big role in the rest of the season. Secondly, at the end of the episode, we learn that Whistler was suppose to hand Scylla to the Chinese, and now that they haven't received it, an unknown Chinese man is heading to Los Angeles.


What I haven't mentioned yet in this review is Sara, who we learn not only had a drug addiction, but an alcohol one too. We see her being tempted, but ultimately refusing, to drink. Sara's grief for Bruce brings some semblance of normality to the episode; amidst everything that is happening, she is still able to grieve for the dear friend that she lost, something the audience will be able to relate to.


The episode ends with Sara being trailed by the Agent assigned to kill the brothers, so we are sure to see an exciting opening to next week's episode. Despite issues with believability, overall I did enjoy this episode.

Comments

5 comments
Default avatar cat
Sep 20, 2008 4:29PM EDT
I was thinking a little more about that- how nobody recognized them. Their whole situation was never really dealt with in depth by the local police. They were a federal case off the bat. Not that local police weren't informed of it and weren't familiar, but they weren't as deep in the pursuits. They were like backup and since the brothers went from state to state, no local police were ever really involved in the other seasons. Since last season was mainly about them in Panama, American police got a break from seeing them, and I'm sure all the flyers everywhere disappeared since they were technically caught. I mean how many of us can really say we would remember what a fugitive from a year ago looks like? Maybe that's what the show didn't really clarify.
Default avatar cat
Sep 19, 2008 5:31PM EDT
I feel there are too many loopholes in this season. its not as flawless as the first season..not even close to it infact...the major flaw in this episode is when scofield goes to steal the info in eagles and angels ceremony, how come no one recognizes them.. after all they are fugitives....so they should have given more thought to the storyline which I feel has too many weakpoints.. but still i liked the episode as it kept me glued to my television somehow so i would recommend this episode.
Default avatar cat
Sep 19, 2008 5:28PM EDT
I feel there are too many loopholes in this season. its not as flawless as the first season..not even close to it infact...the major flaw in this episode is when scofield goes to steal the info in eagles and angels ceremony, how come no one recognizes them.. after all they are fugitives....so they should have given more thought to the storyline which I feel has too many weakpoints.. but still i liked the episode as it kept me glued to my television somehow so i would recommend this episode.
Default avatar cat
Sep 16, 2008 6:36PM EDT
Yeah, I agree with kdhughes. Something definitely seems missing and I think you hit the nail on the head there.
Default avatar cat
Sep 16, 2008 4:26PM EDT
I think that with the complexity of the plots and the way everything always falls into place (even when things don't go according to plan), this show was never that believable in the first place. I think they should revisit what they showed in the first season about how Michael's mind works. I feel like they kind of buried that and so on top of everything being not super credible, he's always got the answer and he's always figuring things out which makes him seem less believable. If they would remind us (three seasons later) about how he's basically a strategic savant and thinks on a higher level than the rest of us, the plot lines would get slightly better and the audience would have an easier time accepting things that may not be completely believable.
Want to comment on this post? First, you must log in to your SideReel account!