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Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince Review by Variety - Featured

Kids' stuff is a thing of the past in "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince." Suddenly looking quite grown up, the students at Hogwarts are forced to grapple with heavy issues of mortality, memory and loss in this sixth installment in the series of bigscreen adaptations of J.K. Rowling's Potter tales. Dazzlingly well made and perhaps deliberately less fanciful than the previous entries, this one is played in a mode closer to palpable life-or-death drama than any of the others and is quite effective as such. Delayed by Warner Bros. from a late 2008 release date so as to spread the wealth after "The Dark Knight" scored so mightily last summer, this "Prince" is poised to follow its predecessors as one of the year's two or three top-earning films.


After sitting out "The Order of the Phoenix," screenwriter Steve Kloves happily returned to once again skillfully condense a massive book into manageable dramatic form; among many tough narrative decisions, he has cut back on the violent mayhem surrounding the murderous climax and put off the introduction of Minister of Magic Rufus Scrimgeour until the next episode.


Director David Yates, after a prosaic series debut on the prior film, displays noticeably increased confidence here, injecting more real-world grit into what began eight years ago as purest child's fantasy; messenger owls and chattering house elves have been superseded by a frank Underground tea-room flirtation, school security checks and raging teenage hormones. The sets have been stripped down to reduce Hogwarts' fairy-book aspects and emphasize its gray medieval character, and even the obligatory Quidditch match is staged with greater attention to spatial comprehensibility than ever before.


As the overarching story ramps up toward one major character's death at the end of part six and the final confrontation between Harry and archfiend Voldemort in the climactic "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows," which is being shot as a two-part film, this increased seriousness is all to the good. It's hard to imagine watching "Half-Blood Prince" as a "Potter" virgin without a clue as to what's come before, but it's a formidable entry with a heft and cinematic texture compromised only by a certain lack of dramatic modulation.


With the villainess of the last picture, Dolores Umbridge, out of the way but the unseen Lord Voldemort in the ascendant, neither London, subject to a startling opening-scene Death Eater attack, nor Hogwarts itself can be regarded as safe from the Dark Lord's gathering storm. While Dumbledore takes Harry along to recruit former colleague Horace Slughorn to return to Hogwarts as new potions professor and, he hopes, to provide crucial revelations about Voldemort, Harry's student nemesis, Draco Malfoy, prepares to commit a heinous crime designed to pave the way for Voldemort's comeback.


While Harry remains mindful of his status as the "Chosen One," he is not entirely exempt from the lusts, jealousies and intrigues that preoccupy his fellow teenagers as never before. While Harry's growing fondness for Ron's sister Ginny is slowly developing, Ron is a sitting duck for the attentions of the irrepressible Lavender Brown. But, as we know, the brilliant Hermione unaccountably loves the comparatively slow-witted Ron, and she has only Harry's shoulder to cry on when he's not squiring space cadet Luna Lovegood.


Read the Full Review:

Variety Film Review: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince


Comments

| Jul 7, 2009 3:04PM EDT
*shrie*... oooh man i can't wait to see and compare to the book and actually see it on film.... HP can not go wrong... i hope =/
| Jul 7, 2009 1:39PM EDT
I can't wait to see the film :D x

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