If I had a billion dollars...


...I would donate it to the "Save Whedon's Shows Foundation". Then finally, the man can be free to do his art in peace. But dreams are just dreams... sigh...


This episode (Belonging) alone shows the painfully obvious potential of the show. The last season was forced to simply introduce to us the idea of the dollhouse, and we all know how much TV studio execs love 13-episode introductions. They don't believe in the high dives, and favor to immediately waddle in the much diluted 3-foot kiddie section of the proverbial "pool." And it's a damn shame, as this episode illuminates.


I am, needless to say, a huge TV buff. And I think serial storytelling is a truly unique art, an art Mr. Whedon has wholly mastered. Last night's episode was almost a breath of fresh air compared to the slower eps we were treated to in this current season. Like the well-received "Epitaph One" episode, this episode really nailed the underlying, and perhaps over-arching, concepts. Instead of (again) seeing Ms. Dushku prance around in skimpy outfits (not that I'm complaining...) this really provided a well-rounded one-two emotional punch.


We finally (further) understand Sierra's origins, and even get a glimpse into her future role in the overall storyline. But what really got the heartstrings strummin' was witnessing the otherwise logical and almost coldly rational Topher having to face a (waiiit for it...) moral dilemma. And it's a perfect first step into the tragically inevitable emotional and mental breakdown our scientist-hero faces. The scene where Ms. Dewitt chews out Topher, in an obvious reflection and projection of her own guilt(s), and the ironically abrupt realization Topher goes through, stirred up many emotions. At this point, we've gone way beyond the ol' "what would I do in his/her/their situation(s)?" thought.


As a realist, one realizes that a show this good and this well-thought can't possibly survive the talons and teeth of the evil men in expensive suits. Like oil and water, the two can hardly harmonize, let alone co-exist. In bizarro-world, however, with less time spent on trying to market the show, and more time effectively telling a wonderful narrative, a show like this can thrive. Honestly, one or two more seasons can do it, and the fans would have a neatly wrapped-up storyline. I'd hate to never reach "Epitaph One's" point in the timeline, that would simply be cruel. One can only hope, at this point...

Comments

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Oct 25, 2009 2:01AM EDT

Nicely said.

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Oct 25, 2009 8:54PM EDT

Hear hear.

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Oct 29, 2009 6:23PM EDT

I feel what you wrote IN SPADES!!!

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Nov 4, 2009 7:02PM EST

Indeed, I agree entirely!

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