The Visitor Review, by A. O. Scott of The New York Times

When we first meet Walter Vale (Richard Jenkins), he is in a state of emotional inertia that clinicians might identify as depression. He does not seem acutely unhappy, but then again, he doesn't seem to feel much at all, locking whatever inner life he might have behind an aloof, unfailingly polite demeanor and keeping a glass of red wine handy in case further anesthesia should prove necessary. A professor of economics at Connecticut College and a widower, Walter plods through an existence that looks comfortable and easy enough, but also profoundly tedious. He recycles old syllabuses and lecture notes for his classes, and suffers through piano lessons in a half-hearted effort to sustain some kind of connection to his wife, who was a classical concert pianist. Early in "The Visitor," Tom McCarthy's second film as writer and director (the first was "The Station Agent"), it seems inevitable that something will come along to shake Walter out of his malaise.


To read the rest of this review, visit The New York Times

Comments

Want to comment on this? First, you must log in to your SideReel account!