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Review:Tokyo!


Two Frenchmen and a South Korean make a great deal of mischief in "Tokyo!," an uneven but enjoyable trio of films that take affectionate (and sometimes literal) aim at the Japanese capital. Fittingly enough, horror and sci-fi rep the primary building blocks of these Tokyo stories, though the ingredients aren't always doled out in the proportions one would expect from filmmakers Michel Gondry, Leos Carax and Bong Joon-ho. Their names should secure the witty omnibus a place on the shelves of cinephiles and genre buffs after a solid fest life and limited theatrical release through Liberation Entertainment.


Like a nastier Eastern sibling to "Paris, je t'aime," "Tokyo!" reps a playfully ragged attempt to capture (and skewer) the multiple shifting identities of its eponymous city.


First and arguably best of the bunch is Gondry's deviously titled "Interior Design," which opens on a dark and stormy night as young, self-deluded aspiring filmmaker Akira (Ryo Kase) and his supportive but directionless g.f. Hiroko (Ayako Fujitani) arrive in Tokyo. Hiroko's attempts to find them an apartment (experiencing firsthand the surreal horrors of low-end Tokyo real estate) leads only to frustration, as does her search for a job.


Akira says early on that people define themselves by what they do, a maxim that takes on startling new meaning when Hiroko undergoes a bizarre but not entirely unwelcome transformation. Gondry handles the light intrusion of Cronenbergian body-horror with minimal f/x and old-fashioned visual sleight-of-hand, keeping his camera focused on Fujitani's engaging performance. The Gallic helmer may have a reputation for dazzling directorial whimsy, but his restraint pays off here in a work at once poignant and slyly Kafka-esque.


Less subtle in moniker and execution, monster-movie parody "Merde" may prove the most intriguing offering to viewers, as it's Carax's first film since 1999's "Pola X." Taking a page from "Godzilla" and its countless cine-spawn (and perhaps paying tribute to fellow helmer Bong's "The Host"), Carax unleashes a hideous, Gollum-like humanoid (a freakishly made-up Denis Lavant) from the sewers onto the cosmopolitan streets of Tokyo.


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