Make sure you're tracking all of fall's coolest new shows; check out our Fall TV Preview now for suggestions!

Supernatural: The Meaning of Dean's Question (Episode 8)


While the revelation that the Trickster is really an angel was a big shock on Supernatural, I was just as mesmerized but a much smaller moment earlier in the episode. When Sam and Dean were trapped in the Japanese game show the host asked Dean "Would your Mother and Father still be alive if your brother was never born?"


It's a disturbing question because, in many ways, the birth of Sam helped start Azazel's master plan to open the gate to Hell, free Lilith and get the ball rolling to free Lucifer. Dean's answer in Japanese was "Yes," which was the correct answer, but is it really?


The argument against it is fairly easy to make. The Trickster's entire objective with his TV parody game was to get Sam and Dean to accept their roles and turn against one another. Sam's question was about the time he abandoned his brother, so Dean's question was also about trying to force a wedge between the brothers.


Obviously in the Trickster's world, Dean saying "Yes" is the correct answer because it shows that he resents Sam's existence. But was that all there is to it?


I'd like to think that Supernatural does nothing by accident, and this question is so potent and omnipresent that there has to be a reason for it beyond the obvious. Will this become a possibility, another Genie-type episode with an alternate reality where Sam was never born? Or will this be the way Lucifer or the angels convince Sam and Dean to accept their vessel roles?


I have no idea what Eric Kripke and his writers are doing on Supernatural, and that's the way I like it. But given how complex the show's mythology has gotten, I'm not taking anything for granted, including a harmless Japanese game show parody. Who knows, maybe Shrimp Chips are a clue too.


Source Here


If You Missed This Episode Watch It Here Online Now

Comments

Default avatar cat
Nov 7, 2009 5:23AM EST
I don't think it means much at all actually. It's rather obvious that if sam had not been born, Mary would not have died in that nursery and the whole thing would not have started BUT since Mary made that deal we can assume that yellow eyes would have come into their lives eventually for something. All the "chosen" children were born on the same year so if Mary had not had a child on that year then the demon would not have had a reason to be there. That "something" could have been something terrible but apparently they wouldn't have died because of it. So that's basically all we learned from that question. Dean and sam did not understand the question so for them this "revelation" means nothing. It seems more of a way to show what the angels are thinking. But it does raise a question why he didn't let them understand it since these are the things that could work in gettin them to drift apart like he wanted. Which makes you wonder if he really wants them to do. The angel/trickster can let them see/ believe ANYTHING, he can create the world around them and if he wanted the end result to be for them to take their parts and go head to head he could have found a much better way to do so. ...which also makes you think how these angels have too much power, how do we know if what Dean saw of the future wasn't just a trick of an angel? You can't really trust anything is reality when such powerful beings can mess with things so easily.
Default avatar cat
Nov 6, 2009 10:32PM EST
I don't have as much faith as you do that everything the writers do on the show is part of some master plan - mostly because they've made themselves guilty of a number of small (and arguable) inconsistencies in the past. (Even though they're generally very good at patching things up). Dean never actually understood his question, so his answer doesn't matter except as it pertains to the Trickster's view of the whole thing. It certainly doesn't mean that Dean resents Sam's existence. Dean knows that Mary's deal with Azazel is what damns their entire family, but then, without it, John would have stayed dead and the boys would have never been born, so there would never have *been* a Winchester family. Also, in the going back in time ep, Castiel implies that no matter what Dean might have done, ultimately, the outcome would have been the same. The predestination thing is kind of a huge deal on SPN right now, so the more pertinent question is, does it even *matter* what choices the brothers make, or are they just stuck playing their roles? What I'm more puzzled about it how the hell an angel in the Supernatural universe can simply choose to leave Heaven and play lethal tricks on humans. How is that not disobeying, or falling or whatever? I'm pretty sure that turning the Trickster into a freaking archangel is an improvisation on the writers' part, but again, they're pretty damn good at turning previously established ideas upside down without writing themselves into impossible corners. Mostly, because they just don't bother with establishing a lot of clear and detailed rules, haha. Still, all that said, I've been enjoying Supernatural immensely these past two seasons. IMHO, this is probably the best show on television right now.
Want to comment on this post? First, you must log in to your SideReel account!