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BBC Worldwide and PBS Announce "Call the Midwife" Christmas Special and Season 7 Filming

The special will air in late 2017 and the seventh season will air in the spring of 2018.  ...Read More... http://www.thefutoncritic.com/news/2017/05/31/bbc-worldwide-and-pbs-announce-call-the-midwife-christmas-special-and-season-7-filming-108413/20170531pbs01/

Five Things you Didnt Know about Call the Midwife

There is much to love about PBSs Call the Midwife. The characters are fantastic, the scripts are brilliant, and the show takes on what life really was like for women in poor communities giving birth. The show makes viewers laugh often and cry a lot because it treats a serious subject matter in such a tender, humorous way. Here are five things you might not have known about Call the Midwife. 5. Chummy Look Familiar? The sturdily built, posh, awkward character of Chummy may look familiar to those who watch BBC Sitcoms. Shes none other than Miranda Hart of the ....Read More... http://www.tvovermind.com/tv-news/five-things-didnt-know-call-midwife

Weekend Binge Guide: February 2017

Have the weekend free? Going out is overrated! Binge-­watch one of these shows instead:   If you want to laugh:   One Day at a Time See all reviews for One Day at a Time I'm not sure what surprised me more: the fact that of all the Norman Lear shows, this bland sitcom about a divorced mother and her two teenage daughters got the Netflix treatment, or the fact that it is good. Yes, it's a multi-cam family comedy that occasionally wades into cheesy territory, but it's refreshingly modern, quirky, and funny. The new One Day at a Time centers on a Cuban-American family led by a military veteran (a revelatory Justina Machado) raising her teen daughter and tween son with the help of her old-school, Cuban-born mother (EGOT winner Rita Moreno). Schneider's around, of course. As is that earworm of a theme song, which got a percussion-heavy makeover from Gloria Estefan. The series isn't afraid to tackle big issues, but it maintains a light, heart-warming quality, making it a wonderful television escape.   If you want to cry:   Call the Midwife See all reviews for Call the Midwife Based on the best-selling memoirs of Jennifer Worth, who died shortly before the first episode was broadcast, this series has found massive success in the U.K. and around the world. The first season follows a young Jenny in the late '50s as she adjusts to her new job at a nursing convent in London's crowded East End, where many of her patients are living in squalor and battling enemies both visible and invisible. Among the most memorable are a Spanish woman pregnant for the 25th time and a 15-year-old Irish girl forced into prostitution. Cheery! The patients' stories are often brutal and actress Jessica Raine, who practically glows onscreen as Jenny, sheds her share of tears. There are occasional laughs, many coming from Miranda Hart's Chummy, but the show's a serious tear-jerker.   If you want to scream:   Sweet/Vicious See all reviews for  Sweet/Vicious MTV's scripted fare has matured in recent years, with shows like Awkward and Faking It balancing youthful bite with mature storytelling. Sweet/Vicious takes the network to the next level, finding a nuanced tone that's perfect for telling such a layered story. The series begins with sunny sorority girl Jules (Eliza Bennett) and weed-dealing hacker Ophelia (Taylor Dearden) teaming up to battle the on-campus sexual assault that is largely ignored by the administration. Both have their reasons for committing so fully to the cause. There are surprising comedic moments, mostly from Dearden (Bryan Cranston's daughter), and superhero-style action sequences, but the show really excels as an exploration of sexual assault and the culture it breeds. Watching terrible men (and a few women) get their asses kicked makes this sweetly cathartic TV.   If you want to think:   Rick Steves' Europe See all reviews for  Rick Steves' Europe Perhaps now more than ever, it's important to look outward and seek a broader perspective. Travel is one of the keys to gaining a richer understanding of the world. Of course, not everyone can make it overseas — there are physical and financial obstacles. But good travel shows can be transformative, too. Rick Steves' long-running PBS series, a companion to his travel book and tour businesses, provides practical tips for visitors to Europe, but it also opens viewers' eyes to the different customs and concerns of people in other countries. Special episodes about Iran, Israel, and Palestine tackle weightier issues than the usual episode, which typically mixes a look back at a region's art with visits to contemporary hot spots. Steves is a gentle, likable guide who has the intelligence of Anthony Bourdain without the smug self-satisfaction.   div.post p { text­align: justify; }

Call the Midwife Renewed for 3 Seasons

Call the Midwife is well on its way to becoming the next Downton Abbey. The popular BBC Onedrama, which airs Stateside on PBS, has been renewed for Seasons 7, 8 and 9, with a Christmas special included in each, our sister site Deadline reports. For those unfamiliar with the scripted drama, it follows a dedicated [] http://tvline.com/2016/11/23/call-the-midwife-renewed-season-9-pbs/

BBC Renews Hit Drama 'Call the Midwife' for 3 Seasons

"Im privileged to have Britains most popular drama series on BBC One," says Charlotte Moore, director of BBC content.   ...Read More... http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/television/~3/QfBsz4XYxgI/bbc-renews-hit-drama-call-midwife-three-seasons-950136

Snapshot: Jessica Raine, a Star of Call the Midwife, on Returning to the 50s With Agatha Christie

The actress, who portrayed Jenny Lee in Midwife, was told by a drama teacher that she should expect to be cast in modern roles.  Read More... http://rss.nytimes.com/c/34625/f/640388/s/4983dc02/sc/14/l/0L0Snytimes0N0C20A150C0A90C0A60Carts0Ctelevision0Csnapshot0Ejessica0Eraine0Ea0Estar0Eof0Ecall0Ethe0Emidwife0Bhtml0Dpartner0Frss0Gemc0Frss/story01.htm

Will 'Call the Midwife' Season 5 heal the Season 4 finale wounds?

The Season 4 finale of "Call the Midwife" was filled with tragedy, love and then a little bit more tragedy. And unfortunately for two of Nonnatus House's beloved residents, Season 5 of the series looks like it's going to be a long road of struggle and recovery. Although there are moments of happiness in the episode -- best wishes to Fred (Cliff Parisi) and Violet (Annabelle Apsion) in their new marriage -- the majority of the finale is heartbreakingly sad. One of the most upsetting scenes in the episode occurs when Delia (Kate Lamb) is critically injured after being hit by a vehicle. Of course, this disaster happens right after she and Patsy (Emerald Fennell) -- the show's trailblazing lesbian couple -- move into a flat together.However, the car accident isn't the worst of it: when Patsy goes to visit Delia in the hospital, it's revealed that she lost her memory in the collision... http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Zap2it/~3/sAfmCwCUo40/call_the_midwife_season_5_tragedies_season_4_finale_wounds_trixie_delia_patsy-2015-05

'Call the Midwife' Season 4: Everything you need to know to start watching now

If you're one of the millions currently experiencing "Downton Abbey" withdrawals, then "Call the Midwife" is the show for you.Season 4 of the BBC drama premieres on Sunday, March 29 on PBS at 8 p.m. ET/PT. The first three seasons are available on Netflix, but if you don't have time to binge watch all of them and want to jump into the baby delivering drama immediately, here is everything you need to know to be caught up.Premise"Call the Midwife" is based on the memoirs of Jennifer Worth about her time as a midwife in East London during the 1950s and 60s. It's a part of London that is still recovering from the devastation of WWII and a young Jenny (Jessica Raine) must learn to care for her patients without the tools and resources she was used to in training. Throughout her years there Jenny befriends her other midwives, falls in love, and grapples with... http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Zap2it/~3/ELJVFAhQTac/call_the_midwife_season_4_everything_you_need_to_know_to_start_watching_now-2015-03

The Most Important Shows on TV: Week of March 23, 2015

Which TV series will your friends (and the entire internet) be talking about this week? Stay informed—or at least be able to fake it—with SideReel's weekly guide to The Most Important Shows on TV.   The Late Late Show with James Corden (Series Premiere) Monday (Tuesday) at 12:30am on CBS Why: The later the show, the weirder/better it is. This is just a fact! There's a reason Letterman and Conan were great (they both started at 12:30am) and Leno was terrible ( it still hurts! ), and while I have no supporting evidence aside from my estimable gut, I know it to be true. Also, James Corden is adorable! Have you watched Gavin & Stacey yet? No? Well, then go do that immediately and then you'll understand. Prepare to talk about: Whether Corden is the appropriate replacement for the delightfully idiosyncratic Craig Ferguson; whether he's too much of an unknown in the US; how he's better than Seth Meyers (then again, who isn't? OK, other than Leno. We all hate Leno!); how there needs to be another season of Gavin & Stacey like, right now.   Pretty Little Liars (Season Finale) Tuesday at 9:00pm on ABC Family Why: PLL has crazy-long seasons, but every episode is nutso enough to be a season finale... which means the REAL season finales are usually even more insane! Do you even SEE the orange jail uniforms in that picture? Jail! Whaaaaat? Stuff's gonna get crAzy (see what I did there?)! Prepare to talk about: Which SHOCKING SECRETS are revealed; who's "A" this time around? Do we even care about "A" anymore or do we just watch Liars for its shenanigans and strange devotion to the whole "A" thing, because seriously, it's played out; there are other letters of the alphabet and other macadamias in Pennsylvania! I know! I used to live there!     Call the Midwife (Season Premiere) Friday at 9:00pm on PBS Why: Because this show makes me you cry , but in a good way! Plus, it fills the classy British hole in your heart left by Downton Abbey 's hiatus—and it's a better show anyway. Plus, the little one whose name is impossible to remember is becoming a nun! That's kind of exciting. This show makes it seem pretty easy to join and leave the sisterhood (remember when Shelagh was Sister Bernadette?), and it makes living with nuns look fun! Who'd-a thunk it? Prepare to talk about: Chummy: Is she the greatest or the best?; Sister Evangelina: Is she the second greatest/best? Whether you miss Jenny and her MAN DRAMA (I don't); whether this show makes you sob or merely cry.     Leah E. Friedman  is the editor of SideReel.com. You can follow her musings on  Twitter .

The Most Important Shows on TV: Week of December 22, 2014

Which TV series will your friends (and the entire internet) be talking about this week? Stay informed—or at least be able to fake it—with SideReel's (admittedly rather Scrooge-like) weekly guide to The Most Important Shows on TV.   One Direction: The TV Special Tuesday at 8:00pm on NBC Why:  Teens worldwide demand it! They can't get enough of Harry, Zayne, Giles(?), Cecil(?), and the other one(?). (I don't know, maybe one of them is Niall? Or Gareth? Wait, no, Gareth is in Los Campesinos! Whatever.) ANYWAY, NBC has nothing else to put on this week, so they've given the boy one-ders ( ed. note to/from self: classic  That Thing You Do!   reference, Leah ) a television special.  Prepare to talk about: Which one is the "cute" one; which one dated Taylor Swift (they all did, maybe?); why One Direction gets a broadcast TV special when neither the Backstreet Boys nor 'NSYNC got one, and they were AMERICAN, and NBC went on to give Carson Daly a job, for god's sake.  Carson Daly . Just noodle on those things, OK?   Doctor Who (Christmas Special) Thursday at 6:15pm on BBC One and 9:00pm on BBC America Why:   Doctor Who  has been making Christmas specials for roughly 10,000 years. Yes, they were making them before television was even a thing (before Britain was even a thing, really) and it's basically the only thing you can count on on Christmas because it's not like you can count on your family (or so I hear; I'll be off eating latkes). Prepare to talk about: Whether you're feeling Peter Capaldi as the 12th Doctor; how the Brits really  invest  in Christmas television programming while Americans don't, and what that says about our respective cultures; why Nick Frost is playing Santa Claus when he has the perfect real-life name to play something seasonally appropriate.      Call the Midwife (Christmas Special) Thursday at 7:50pm on BBC One and 8:00pm on PBS Why: Because this is a lovely, warm show that also features a bunch of nuns as main characters. I mean, if ever a show was made for Christmas specials, it's  Call the Midwife . Prepare to talk about: Whether this year's heartwarming/heartwrending tale can match last year's polio yarn; whether it's the same without Jenny (hint: she was the worst, so it's actually way better); how Chummy and Sister Evangelina are the best, and how they should have their own spin-off buddy comedy show.     Leah E. Friedman  is the editor of SideReel.com. She wishes you all a happy merry. You can follow her musings on  Twitter .