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Episode 13: Mizumono

Episode 13

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by Lucy
Apr 30, 2017 4:53PM EDT
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I've just finished season 2 of Hannibal and what a season it was! It starts off with a punch, and fast forwards 12 weeks into the future, featuring an explosive knife fight between Jack Crawford and Hannibal - without showing the conclusion to the fight before being dragged to the current storyline 12 weeks prior. Letting the audience know that this is the season that Jack will discover Hannibal’s true identity tells us already that at some point Hannibal will make a mistake (which is unconventional of his character as he’s always shown absolute perfection before) to allow Jack to believe he’s not innocent. The series continues in a different manner to series 1 as Jack and Hannibal work together on cases and Will is the one under suspicion. Will’s relationship with Beverley grows nicely in the first few episodes and I admire Beverley’s determination in the search for the truth. BUT WHY DID YOU KILL HER OFF??! Aside from Beverley’s growing assertiveness, Alana, Bedelia, Freddie and the other women of the Hannibal universe are all strong characters, differing greatly in their intentions and ultimate goals. Alana, like Jack, wants the truth and to do her job, but she gets blinded/used by Hannibal. This season is all about her realising where she fits into the FBI and where she fits into the relationships with Hannibal, Jack and Will. I feel that if she survives (I sure hope so :3) she’ll be a fitting player in the game Hannibal is making. Freddie also has an interesting series, becoming slightly more empathetic and working in the background, rather than the foreground. Bedelia has moved to the forefront as an important character, her past and current relationship with Hannibal being explored through flashbacks and intriguing interviews. I think she will have a big role in season 3 and I look forward to seeing how far she will go with Hannibal before fighting for her own life. The world of Hannibal is totally immersive, theatrical and heightened in every possible way. The audience doesn’t see any sort of ‘everyday’ reality in the Hannibal universe, the nearest they get are the interactions between Bella and Jack (which are dark for their own reason). The jarring, dysfunctional music exaggerates the tension and surrealism of the show, and is of contrast to the beautifully flowing classical pieces that highlight the two faces that Hannibal portrays in private and in public. The elaborate dinner parties, truly horrific murders the team investigate and the highly sophisticated mental games played during the show all add to the theatre of Hannibal and this aesthetic is highly successful at drawing the audience into this dark, surreal world - but also the total immersion makes it believable too. The lack of any sort of light is also reflected in the lack of physical light we get in the cinematography. The series starts out with more daylight/outdoor shots, but quickly descends into scenes devoid of colour. The characters all wear dark clothing (reds/purples/black) and the scenes themselves get darker as the season progresses, or happen entirely at night to give the characters very little to go on. Any new characters to the show wear clashing colours, to indicate how they clash from the theatrical world of Hannibal (the vibrant orange suit by Prurnell or the brown of Margo’s jacket are prime examples). The overall look of the show is still as exquisite as season 1, with stunning set pieces of food as well as such attention to detail with clothing, furniture and set design that rivals almost all other shows on tv. The introduction of Margo and Mason Verger late in the season was an ambitious one, but their presence allows both Hannibal and Will to up their power plays and utilise the scenarios and settings these new characters provide. Margo I feel has more to offer in season 3, as even after the horrors she has faced this season, she has survived to defy her brothers wishes. Mason’s cruelty and disregard for his sister’s feelings were painful to watch at times - the scene were he eats his own face after Hannibal has ‘treated’ him was perhaps the most disturbing scene of season 2, but powerfully acted. Another key difference to this season was the shift in power dynamics between Will and Hannibal. Throughout season 1, Hannibal almost entirely had the upper hand but towards the latter half of season 2 (and especially when Will is freed from prison) Will begins to have some sway over Hannibal and lead him nicely into situations which he can control. I loved how Hannibal and Will both were trying to construct a world where they could frame the other for crimes and reveal in killing. It really showed how far Will had come as to overcome his psychological battles with his sanity, hallucinations (they rapidly dropped off in the last half of the season) and his paranoia that he really was the murderer. His composure and mental dexterity are enough to convince Hannibal of his pleasure of joining him in killing as well as convincing Jack of Hannibal’s murderous intent. A fine showcase of a psychological thriller all season. Jack is thrust to the forefront in this series, firstly due to his conduct of Will’s mental breakdown and the court case against WIll himself. But his growing distrust of Hannibal and intention of finding out who murdered yet another member of his team (RIP Beverley) pushes him out of his clinically managed FBI comfort zone into the mind games of Hannibal’s world. His obsession with catching the Chesapeake Ripper becomes an overriding desire so much so that he bends FBI protocol, dodges lawsuits and drives his work colleagues to extremes to catch him. His neglect of his wife is also apparent, with their body language becoming more fragmented over the course of the season. By the time we re-visit the opening scene and see the conclusion of the knife fight between Hannibal and Jack, it’s weighty with its character development and now that the stakes are known, the intensity rises again to make a thrilling climax. Which is a truly remarkable seeing as the audience already has seen the fight scene. The shocking conclusion to the show, 4 characters being stabbed, as well as the surprise return of Abigail (well briefly, RIP Abi) ends the series on a tense and shadowy nature as the murder walks free, escaping to brighter pastures. I really have enjoyed all aspects of season 2, it has built beautifully on the solid characters and scenarios of season 1, and brought an intricacy to the game play as well as higher stakes and more empathy for all the characters involved. The tiniest of touches, for example the tick tock ticking clock ostinato during the finale (signifying time running out for all) really set this show apart from many others on tv today.
I've just finished season 2 of Hannibal and what a season it was! It starts off with a punch, and fast forwards 12 weeks into the future, featuring an explosive knife fight between Jack Crawford and Hannibal - without showing the conclusion to the fight before being dragged to the current storyline 12 weeks prior. Letting the audience know that this is the season that Jack will discover Hannibal’s true identity tells us already that at some point Hannibal will make a mistake (which is unconventional of his character as he’s always shown absolute perfection before) to allow Jack to believe he’s not innocent. The series continues in a different manner to series 1 as Jack and Hannibal work together on cases and Will is the one under suspicion. Will’s relationship with Beverley grows nicely in the first few episodes and I admire Beverley’s determination in the search for the truth. BUT WHY DID YOU KILL HER OFF??! Aside from Beverley’s growing assertiveness, Alana, Bedelia, Freddie and the other women of the Hannibal universe are all strong characters, differing greatly in their intentions and ultimate goals. Alana, like Jack, wants the truth and to do her job, but she gets blinded/used by Hannibal. This season is all about her realising where she fits into the FBI and where she fits into the relationships with Hannibal, Jack and Will. I feel that if she survives (I sure hope so :3) she’ll be a fitting player in the game Hannibal is making. Freddie also has an interesting series, becoming slightly more empathetic and working in the background, rather than the foreground. Bedelia has moved to the forefront as an important character, her past and current relationship with Hannibal being explored through flashbacks and intriguing interviews. I think she will have a big role in season 3 and I look forward to seeing how far she will go with Hannibal before fighting for her own life. The world of Hannibal is totally immersive, theatrical and heightened in every possible way. The audience doesn’t see any sort of ‘everyday’ reality in the Hannibal universe, the nearest they get are the interactions between Bella and Jack (which are dark for their own reason). The jarring, dysfunctional music exaggerates the tension and surrealism of the show, and is of contrast to the beautifully flowing classical pieces that highlight the two faces that Hannibal portrays in private and in public. The elaborate dinner parties, truly horrific murders the team investigate and the highly sophisticated mental games played during the show all add to the theatre of Hannibal and this aesthetic is highly successful at drawing the audience into this dark, surreal world - but also the total immersion makes it believable too. The lack of any sort of light is also reflected in the lack of physical light we get in the cinematography. The series starts out with more daylight/outdoor shots, but quickly descends into scenes devoid of colour. The characters all wear dark clothing (reds/purples/black) and the scenes themselves get darker as the season progresses, or happen entirely at night to give the characters very little to go on. Any new characters to the show wear clashing colours, to indicate how they clash from the theatrical world of Hannibal (the vibrant orange suit by Prurnell or the brown of Margo’s jacket are prime examples). The overall look of the show is still as exquisite as season 1, with stunning set pieces of food as well as such attention to detail with clothing, furniture and set design that rivals almost all other shows on tv. The introduction of Margo and Mason Verger late in the season was an ambitious one, but their presence allows both Hannibal and Will to up their power plays and utilise the scenarios and settings these new characters provide. Margo I feel has more to offer in season 3, as even after the horrors she has faced this season, she has survived to defy her brothers wishes. Mason’s cruelty and disregard for his sister’s feelings were painful to watch at times - the scene were he eats his own face after Hannibal has ‘treated’ him was perhaps the most disturbing scene of season 2, but powerfully acted. Another key difference to this season was the shift in power dynamics between Will and Hannibal. Throughout season 1, Hannibal almost entirely had the upper hand but towards the latter half of season 2 (and especially when Will is freed from prison) Will begins to have some sway over Hannibal and lead him nicely into situations which he can control. I loved how Hannibal and Will both were trying to construct a world where they could frame the other for crimes and reveal in killing. It really showed how far Will had come as to overcome his psychological battles with his sanity, hallucinations (they rapidly dropped off in the last half of the season) and his paranoia that he really was the murderer. His composure and mental dexterity are enough to convince Hannibal of his pleasure of joining him in killing as well as convincing Jack of Hannibal’s murderous intent. A fine showcase of a psychological thriller all season. Jack is thrust to the forefront in this series, firstly due to his conduct of Will’s mental breakdown and the court case against WIll himself. But his growing distrust of Hannibal and intention of finding out who murdered yet another member of his team (RIP Beverley) pushes him out of his clinically managed FBI comfort zone into the mind games of Hannibal’s world. His obsession with catching the Chesapeake Ripper becomes an overriding desire so much so that he bends FBI protocol, dodges lawsuits and drives his work colleagues to extremes to catch him. His neglect of his wife is also apparent, with their body language becoming more fragmented over the course of the season. By the time we re-visit the opening scene and see the conclusion of the knife fight between Hannibal and Jack, it’s weighty with its character development and now that the stakes are known, the intensity rises again to make a thrilling climax. Which is a truly remarkable seeing as the audience already has seen the fight scene. The shocking conclusion to the show, 4 characters being stabbed, as well as the surprise return of Abigail (well briefly, RIP Abi) ends the series on a tense and shadowy nature as the murder walks free, escaping to brighter pastures. I really have enjoyed all aspects of season 2, it has built beautifully on the solid characters and scenarios of season 1, and brought an intricacy to the game play as well as higher stakes and more empathy for all the characters involved. The tiniest of touches, for example the tick tock ticking clock ostinato during the finale (signifying time running out for all) really set this show apart from many others on tv today.
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