Episode 13: The Wrath of the Lamb

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Episode 13

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by Lucy
Apr 30, 2017 4:53PM EDT
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Season 3 of Hannibal was hard to stomach, but a thrilling and immersive show with rich cinematography, nauseating plot lines and characters delving beyond their limits to present a show unlike any other. Hannibal is definitely a ‘one episode at a time’ show, and it’s taken me an age to watch and even longer to review, but I’ve finally realised how powerful the performances are in the show as certain scenes have stayed with me all this time. The actors who portray Will Graham, Hannibal and BeDelia all encompass the very souls of their characters and give absolutely stunning performances all season that evoke the complexities of their three way relationship as well as the facades they present to other characters. Hannibal is the focus of the first few episodes as we see his new life in Italy, where he tricks every new character there as well as he has done in the US. He and Bedelia make an unusually perseptive team, and exploring their fascinating with human flesh in a different location was equally gross and fascinating. Bedelia hides and exposes different parts of herself - we see less of the therapist and more of her innate curiosity into psychopathology (specifically Hannibal and Will’s). She certainly plays an complex female character with a strong presence throughout the season, which was great! Will Graham goes on quite the journey in the final season, he goes from despising, to searching, to capturing, to admiring, to working with, to loving Hannibal across the season. Will begins the season by recovering from injuries sustained at the end of series 2, and searching for Hannibal across Europe for the first few episodes, piecing together a very introspective backstory of Hannibal and his origins in eating people. He discovers on this journey how connected he is with Hannibal and that he “has never known himself better than when he is with Lecter” - a phrase that couple sum up the all consuing relationship the two men have with each other. It takes a few episodes for the two men to actually meet, but the mutural pining for each other and electrifyingly charged meeting at an art gallery was well worth the wait. Each man trying to determine how much had changed in their relaionship, whilst simlatenously wanting to consume and destroy each other was a real masterpiece. Their intense focus on each other continues when Mason Verger has them transported from Italy back to the US and the pinnacle episode “Digestivo” begins. Now, I’ve watched Hannibal and become slightly immune to the cannibalism and gore but being choked by eels, a foetus growing in a pig amongst other gory elements really did make me gag and leave the room. Hannibal has always been a show about strong visuals and pushing the bounaries of human form but this season really went far out. After the brutality and gore, the season does a 180 and introduces new characters and plot lines for the final 5 episodes. The Red Dragon was an arc that felt far more like previous Hannibal seasons - an unusual serial killer case that required Will/Hannibal’s unique perspective to solve. I felt the final 5 episodes were much better paced than the first part of the season, purely s all the main characters were in the same location and most were either recovering from the earlier events of the season, or were actively working on the case. I enjoyed how Will was more of a FBI profiler and thinking more clearly than he has down for a long time whilst working on the Red Dragon case. Seeing Will retreat from Hannibal’s influence and turn their relationship around so he is more in control was an interesting change in dynamic and certainly gave the scenes where Will and Hannibal were together a different ambience. Alana comes more into play in the latter half of the season - she and Frederick (how is he still alive?!) do a compelling job at trying to get one step ahead of Hannibal (and to some extent Will) but ultimately are no match for the key players of Hannibal and Will - they dance round each other and play each other so well, it was hard at times to work out who knew what and who was helping whom. By the end of the season, it is clear that neither Hannibal or Will can live without each other. Their co-dependency is completed by the joint murdering of The Red Dragon, in an exemplary two vs one fight scene next to a dark cliff face with the sea swirling below. The tender moments shared between the two men just after the fight, before the fall to be engulfed by the sea, was heartbreaking and deeply moving. For all their dark, twisted and perseptive minds, these two characters have a passionate connection that held each other up, and allowed them to truly be themselves. Their final harmonius act of falling into the sea was a poetic masterpiece, even if it left the series with little closure as to their fates and that of many other characters. Although the storyline of the season was jarring and confusing at times, the characters were strong and true to their individual natures. By only allowing glimpses of the outside world, Hannibal is a show that is suspended in it’s own mythology and desires of its main characters - which gives the audience a greater sense of immersion and does get you thinking deeply about many of the horrors showcased, almost treating them as ‘normal’. Once again, I cannot fault the music, ambience or cinematography of the show. Everything flows together effortlessly to highlight the inky darkness, shades of grey and few light specks in the narrative as well as create an emotive atmosphere where characters shield and twist their true intentions from each other. The musical interludes injected horror, thriller and heightened emotion in every scene and perfectly accompanied the acting of each character, to convey additional depth to their actions. Overall, I did enjoy watching the conclusion to the show, and I was pleased that the main theme of the entire season was on the ups and downs of Hannibal and Will’s intense relationship. These characters are so well written and acted, I still get shivers every time I see Mads Mikkelsen! The Red Dragon arc gave us a glimpse at how Hannibal could have gone down the Silence of the Lambs route, with Hannibal in prison but still controlling everything he could. The after credits scene gave a hint of a possible continuation of the story, but I feel it’s unlikely we’ll get to see more of these characters, and actually I’m okay with that. Ending on a high point narratively is a truly impressive feat, and I take my hat off to everyone involved the show for creating something on tv which we won’t ever see the likes of again.
Season 3 of Hannibal was hard to stomach, but a thrilling and immersive show with rich cinematography, nauseating plot lines and characters delving beyond their limits to present a show unlike any other. Hannibal is definitely a ‘one episode at a time’ show, and it’s taken me an age to watch and even longer to review, but I’ve finally realised how powerful the performances are in the show as certain scenes have stayed with me all this time. The actors who portray Will Graham, Hannibal and BeDelia all encompass the very souls of their characters and give absolutely stunning performances all season that evoke the complexities of their three way relationship as well as the facades they present to other characters. Hannibal is the focus of the first few episodes as we see his new life in Italy, where he tricks every new character there as well as he has done in the US. He and Bedelia make an unusually perseptive team, and exploring their fascinating with human flesh in a different location was equally gross and fascinating. Bedelia hides and exposes different parts of herself - we see less of the therapist and more of her innate curiosity into psychopathology (specifically Hannibal and Will’s). She certainly plays an complex female character with a strong presence throughout the season, which was great! Will Graham goes on quite the journey in the final season, he goes from despising, to searching, to capturing, to admiring, to working with, to loving Hannibal across the season. Will begins the season by recovering from injuries sustained at the end of series 2, and searching for Hannibal across Europe for the first few episodes, piecing together a very introspective backstory of Hannibal and his origins in eating people. He discovers on this journey how connected he is with Hannibal and that he “has never known himself better than when he is with Lecter” - a phrase that couple sum up the all consuing relationship the two men have with each other. It takes a few episodes for the two men to actually meet, but the mutural pining for each other and electrifyingly charged meeting at an art gallery was well worth the wait. Each man trying to determine how much had changed in their relaionship, whilst simlatenously wanting to consume and destroy each other was a real masterpiece. Their intense focus on each other continues when Mason Verger has them transported from Italy back to the US and the pinnacle episode “Digestivo” begins. Now, I’ve watched Hannibal and become slightly immune to the cannibalism and gore but being choked by eels, a foetus growing in a pig amongst other gory elements really did make me gag and leave the room. Hannibal has always been a show about strong visuals and pushing the bounaries of human form but this season really went far out. After the brutality and gore, the season does a 180 and introduces new characters and plot lines for the final 5 episodes. The Red Dragon was an arc that felt far more like previous Hannibal seasons - an unusual serial killer case that required Will/Hannibal’s unique perspective to solve. I felt the final 5 episodes were much better paced than the first part of the season, purely s all the main characters were in the same location and most were either recovering from the earlier events of the season, or were actively working on the case. I enjoyed how Will was more of a FBI profiler and thinking more clearly than he has down for a long time whilst working on the Red Dragon case. Seeing Will retreat from Hannibal’s influence and turn their relationship around so he is more in control was an interesting change in dynamic and certainly gave the scenes where Will and Hannibal were together a different ambience. Alana comes more into play in the latter half of the season - she and Frederick (how is he still alive?!) do a compelling job at trying to get one step ahead of Hannibal (and to some extent Will) but ultimately are no match for the key players of Hannibal and Will - they dance round each other and play each other so well, it was hard at times to work out who knew what and who was helping whom. By the end of the season, it is clear that neither Hannibal or Will can live without each other. Their co-dependency is completed by the joint murdering of The Red Dragon, in an exemplary two vs one fight scene next to a dark cliff face with the sea swirling below. The tender moments shared between the two men just after the fight, before the fall to be engulfed by the sea, was heartbreaking and deeply moving. For all their dark, twisted and perseptive minds, these two characters have a passionate connection that held each other up, and allowed them to truly be themselves. Their final harmonius act of falling into the sea was a poetic masterpiece, even if it left the series with little closure as to their fates and that of many other characters. Although the storyline of the season was jarring and confusing at times, the characters were strong and true to their individual natures. By only allowing glimpses of the outside world, Hannibal is a show that is suspended in it’s own mythology and desires of its main characters - which gives the audience a greater sense of immersion and does get you thinking deeply about many of the horrors showcased, almost treating them as ‘normal’. Once again, I cannot fault the music, ambience or cinematography of the show. Everything flows together effortlessly to highlight the inky darkness, shades of grey and few light specks in the narrative as well as create an emotive atmosphere where characters shield and twist their true intentions from each other. The musical interludes injected horror, thriller and heightened emotion in every scene and perfectly accompanied the acting of each character, to convey additional depth to their actions. Overall, I did enjoy watching the conclusion to the show, and I was pleased that the main theme of the entire season was on the ups and downs of Hannibal and Will’s intense relationship. These characters are so well written and acted, I still get shivers every time I see Mads Mikkelsen! The Red Dragon arc gave us a glimpse at how Hannibal could have gone down the Silence of the Lambs route, with Hannibal in prison but still controlling everything he could. The after credits scene gave a hint of a possible continuation of the story, but I feel it’s unlikely we’ll get to see more of these characters, and actually I’m okay with that. Ending on a high point narratively is a truly impressive feat, and I take my hat off to everyone involved the show for creating something on tv which we won’t ever see the likes of again.