Episode 12: Long Time Coming

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Episode 12

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by Lucy
May 29, 2017 12:43PM EDT
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Season 4 is definitely a game changer for Carrie and the CIA. I definitely appreciate the clever plot twists and beautifully written tension in the show. The research the producers/writers put in is evident and I for one would love to see more of this kind of smart, character driven tv peppered with ‘grey’ characters and stunning acting. The premise at the start of season 4 is for Carrie to keep being a solid station chief in Kabul and to move on from Brody’s death. The death of station chief Sandi in Pakistan is the catalyst for a series of events to move her away from job security and back into the field as station chief in Islamabad/undercover operative to find out what happened to Sandi and to stop terrorist Haqqani’s growing regime. The focus back on Carrie and the CIA against terrorists is a good move by the show and really gets back into the heart of what made Homeland so good in the first season: Carrie doing her job unconventionally and brilliantly against many outside pressures. Lots of great Carrie and Peter Quinn interactions this season, and their relationship is developed well over the course of the season, with both of them battling each other and their own beliefs to do what is right and what would protect each other. Quinn has always had a more intuitive moral compass compared to Carrie, and his ethical questioning of missions really gets to the heart of matters in the show, even making Carrie think twice on occasion. Peter has really opened up emotionally this season, though he still has his moments of being a ruthless black ops trained stealth assassin CIA superstar bomb maker spy master, which are very intriguing too! Carrie and Saul’s relationship goes up and down this season, trusting and not trusting each other, lying to each other, work seamlessly together, saving each other and even betraying each other as the season draws to a close. Their relationship is so crucial to American intelligence and the season as a whole, it was interesting to see them get past the old student/mentor relationship into over-dependent co-workers and thrust them both into terrifying and tense situations. Brilliant acting all round with these two. I was very pleased to see Max the technician get more a prominent role this season, as well as the welcome return of Fara as another great female CIA officer. The introduction of the US ambassador was great, she was a sensible political powerhouse that the series desperately needed, as Lockhart heading the CIA in the US doesn’t do a great job in his political role…. Although this season did show us more of the struggles Lockhart faces and how impossible the situations involving terrorism are, which did make me warm to him more by the end of the season (as well as the infamous lasagne scene, which really helped humanise his character). I enjoyed all the action in Pakistan and the group of CIA workers/Pakistani government officials and terrorists we followed during the season. It showed corruption in both the USA and Pakistan and also good souls in both camps, trying hard to find the best deal for everyone. The story of Aayan and his part in the terrorist network was a very grey story that showed how networks work and that the most normal of people can inadvertently get caught up in terrorism. I also enjoyed Carrie’s family struggles; her breaking relationship with her sister, reconnecting with her absent mother and her new found struggles with motherhood. Carrie’s worries about her mood disorder and her depression over Brody prevent her from bonding with her child and it’s heartbreaking to see her not want anything to do with her baby :( It was also heartbreaking to see Carrie’s despair at her fathers death, he was such a great character (although the actor playing him died) it would be great to see more of him in flashbacks or something in the future. There have been some phenomenal episodes this season, but 13 hours in Islamabad deserves a special mention as one of the most brilliantly written, acted and directed television episodes I’ve ever watched. The stakes were high, the pacing was spot on and it was beyond tense all the way through, with all characters having roles to play and no one guaranteed to survive (RIP Fara). After that episode, the remainder of the season mainly tied up loose ends and set up shop for the next season, which was a teeny bit of a let down, but overall I feel that season 4 has been a triumphant return to form for Homeland, feeling incredible realistic and bringing to our screens the true horrors and battles the CIA faces on a daily basis. I hope the series continues to expand on this realistic, ‘happening right now’ storytelling when season 5 takes us to Germany (though I am very worried about what might happen to Quinn on his latest black ops mission) Bring me some excellent Quinn, Saul and Carrie character development and I shall be happy!
Season 4 is definitely a game changer for Carrie and the CIA. I definitely appreciate the clever plot twists and beautifully written tension in the show. The research the producers/writers put in is evident and I for one would love to see more of this kind of smart, character driven tv peppered with ‘grey’ characters and stunning acting. The premise at the start of season 4 is for Carrie to keep being a solid station chief in Kabul and to move on from Brody’s death. The death of station chief Sandi in Pakistan is the catalyst for a series of events to move her away from job security and back into the field as station chief in Islamabad/undercover operative to find out what happened to Sandi and to stop terrorist Haqqani’s growing regime. The focus back on Carrie and the CIA against terrorists is a good move by the show and really gets back into the heart of what made Homeland so good in the first season: Carrie doing her job unconventionally and brilliantly against many outside pressures. Lots of great Carrie and Peter Quinn interactions this season, and their relationship is developed well over the course of the season, with both of them battling each other and their own beliefs to do what is right and what would protect each other. Quinn has always had a more intuitive moral compass compared to Carrie, and his ethical questioning of missions really gets to the heart of matters in the show, even making Carrie think twice on occasion. Peter has really opened up emotionally this season, though he still has his moments of being a ruthless black ops trained stealth assassin CIA superstar bomb maker spy master, which are very intriguing too! Carrie and Saul’s relationship goes up and down this season, trusting and not trusting each other, lying to each other, work seamlessly together, saving each other and even betraying each other as the season draws to a close. Their relationship is so crucial to American intelligence and the season as a whole, it was interesting to see them get past the old student/mentor relationship into over-dependent co-workers and thrust them both into terrifying and tense situations. Brilliant acting all round with these two. I was very pleased to see Max the technician get more a prominent role this season, as well as the welcome return of Fara as another great female CIA officer. The introduction of the US ambassador was great, she was a sensible political powerhouse that the series desperately needed, as Lockhart heading the CIA in the US doesn’t do a great job in his political role…. Although this season did show us more of the struggles Lockhart faces and how impossible the situations involving terrorism are, which did make me warm to him more by the end of the season (as well as the infamous lasagne scene, which really helped humanise his character). I enjoyed all the action in Pakistan and the group of CIA workers/Pakistani government officials and terrorists we followed during the season. It showed corruption in both the USA and Pakistan and also good souls in both camps, trying hard to find the best deal for everyone. The story of Aayan and his part in the terrorist network was a very grey story that showed how networks work and that the most normal of people can inadvertently get caught up in terrorism. I also enjoyed Carrie’s family struggles; her breaking relationship with her sister, reconnecting with her absent mother and her new found struggles with motherhood. Carrie’s worries about her mood disorder and her depression over Brody prevent her from bonding with her child and it’s heartbreaking to see her not want anything to do with her baby :( It was also heartbreaking to see Carrie’s despair at her fathers death, he was such a great character (although the actor playing him died) it would be great to see more of him in flashbacks or something in the future. There have been some phenomenal episodes this season, but 13 hours in Islamabad deserves a special mention as one of the most brilliantly written, acted and directed television episodes I’ve ever watched. The stakes were high, the pacing was spot on and it was beyond tense all the way through, with all characters having roles to play and no one guaranteed to survive (RIP Fara). After that episode, the remainder of the season mainly tied up loose ends and set up shop for the next season, which was a teeny bit of a let down, but overall I feel that season 4 has been a triumphant return to form for Homeland, feeling incredible realistic and bringing to our screens the true horrors and battles the CIA faces on a daily basis. I hope the series continues to expand on this realistic, ‘happening right now’ storytelling when season 5 takes us to Germany (though I am very worried about what might happen to Quinn on his latest black ops mission) Bring me some excellent Quinn, Saul and Carrie character development and I shall be happy!