Episode 12: A False Glimmer

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Episode 12

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by Lucy
May 29, 2017 12:42PM EDT
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Season 5 is a highly compelling and fulfilling series of the excellent CIA show. The change of scene to Germany/Europe was a welcome one and gave the whole show a burst of energy and reminded me of the early Bourne films, where everything is connected and everyone is double crossing each other. As always, Homeland focuses on national/international security issues that are covered in current media. Season 5 is based around leaked documents (referencing the leaked NSA documents by Snowden) and the damage secrets can cause. The CIA leak happens in episode 1 and starts a chain of events that leads to the CIA and BND working together, to supress the information that reveals the CIA and BND are working/surveiling together (ironic right?). By the time the CIA documents are leaked, all our favourite main characters are in Europe: Saul is with CIA investigating the leak, Peter Quinn is back (and hardened) from Syria, Dar Adal is head of the CIA, Astrid is still working for the BND and Carrie is happilly settled in Germany with young daughter Frannie and (really good looking) boyfriend Jonas, working as head of security for Otto Düring. I felt that the characters naturally gravitated to wards Europe and it certainly made for a fresh and dynamic feel for the series, compared to being in the US or stuck in the middle east all season. We meet new main character Allison Carr, the current Berlin CIA Chief of Station early on in the season but it takes time for the audience to establish the kind of person she is. What develops is a complex grey character who manages to portray a Russian spy, intelligent CIA operative and agressive double agent with gutsy long game perfomance, utilising many tactics we are more familar seeing Carrie play across the seasons of Homeland. Allison double crosses the CIA, becomes too comfortable and entangled with the Russians as well as seduces Saul - possibly the most shocking scene of the season, to find Saul in bed with her!! Allison is almost like the ‘bad’ version of Carrie, and I enjoyed seeing a confident, intelligent women go to any lengths without any morals, offerin us a glimpse of what Carrie could end up like. A great addition to the season! Astrid is also a welcome addition to the cast. She’s been my favourite female for a while now, being the ‘best’ version of Carrie, where she follows instinct and intuition as well as working within her means. Astrid researches, plans and follows through on a straighter road than Carrie, but she still has a heart and puts priorities on keeping those close to her safe (ie Peter Quinn). Lovely to see more of a sassy and caring side of Astrid this season! Journalist Laua is more aggressive and instinct driven than the other ladies on the show, but you can’t deny her passion for the job and her desire to search for and share the truth. All in all, season 5 of Homeland has done a super job of portraying 4 very different, vibrant and complex women in major roles this season. Carrie (naturally) is nearly assinated in only the second episode of the show, and regretfully sends her daughter back to the US for the rest of the season to try and work out which one of the many, still alive, terrorists she’s met over the years is now trying to hurt her. She spends much of the season on the run in Germany, very Jason Bourne-esqe, and trying to understand the complications of the CIA document leak, with Allison’s Russian spy connection as well as where Saul, the CIA and Quinn stand on the issue. Her questionable ethics rise up more and more often as she puts Jonas, Otto and Quinn in difficult positions throughout the season, but ultimately Carrie does good in the end and her finale of jumping into the unknown and running through a train tunnel was absolutely compelling to watch. The season has a tight season arc, great supporting plot lines and strong female caracters throughout. It has its weaker moments; Saul is not on top form this season, his divorce from his wife has sent him tumbling into desperation at times and anger - not the usual things we associate with the calm and passionate Saul we know and love. I was disappointed at how long it took for him and Carrie to make amends and work together, rather than against each other. Poor Quinn also has a rough time this season, getting shot, injured, hospitalised and then gassed with sarin leaving him near death by season’s end :(( This season of Homeland focuses more on traditional spywork of missing documents, keeping information safe, double agents, spies and thier networks and protecting friends and communities from terror. It felt more like one big intelligence operation, from begining tp end which was arefreshing change from all the political/counter terrorism discussions about arms deals etc that most other seasons of Homeland seem to have had as subplots. Definitely my favourite season of Homeland to date, hopefully this dynamic run continues for further seasons with more exciting adventures of Carrie and co.
Season 5 is a highly compelling and fulfilling series of the excellent CIA show. The change of scene to Germany/Europe was a welcome one and gave the whole show a burst of energy and reminded me of the early Bourne films, where everything is connected and everyone is double crossing each other. As always, Homeland focuses on national/international security issues that are covered in current media. Season 5 is based around leaked documents (referencing the leaked NSA documents by Snowden) and the damage secrets can cause. The CIA leak happens in episode 1 and starts a chain of events that leads to the CIA and BND working together, to supress the information that reveals the CIA and BND are working/surveiling together (ironic right?). By the time the CIA documents are leaked, all our favourite main characters are in Europe: Saul is with CIA investigating the leak, Peter Quinn is back (and hardened) from Syria, Dar Adal is head of the CIA, Astrid is still working for the BND and Carrie is happilly settled in Germany with young daughter Frannie and (really good looking) boyfriend Jonas, working as head of security for Otto Düring. I felt that the characters naturally gravitated to wards Europe and it certainly made for a fresh and dynamic feel for the series, compared to being in the US or stuck in the middle east all season. We meet new main character Allison Carr, the current Berlin CIA Chief of Station early on in the season but it takes time for the audience to establish the kind of person she is. What develops is a complex grey character who manages to portray a Russian spy, intelligent CIA operative and agressive double agent with gutsy long game perfomance, utilising many tactics we are more familar seeing Carrie play across the seasons of Homeland. Allison double crosses the CIA, becomes too comfortable and entangled with the Russians as well as seduces Saul - possibly the most shocking scene of the season, to find Saul in bed with her!! Allison is almost like the ‘bad’ version of Carrie, and I enjoyed seeing a confident, intelligent women go to any lengths without any morals, offerin us a glimpse of what Carrie could end up like. A great addition to the season! Astrid is also a welcome addition to the cast. She’s been my favourite female for a while now, being the ‘best’ version of Carrie, where she follows instinct and intuition as well as working within her means. Astrid researches, plans and follows through on a straighter road than Carrie, but she still has a heart and puts priorities on keeping those close to her safe (ie Peter Quinn). Lovely to see more of a sassy and caring side of Astrid this season! Journalist Laua is more aggressive and instinct driven than the other ladies on the show, but you can’t deny her passion for the job and her desire to search for and share the truth. All in all, season 5 of Homeland has done a super job of portraying 4 very different, vibrant and complex women in major roles this season. Carrie (naturally) is nearly assinated in only the second episode of the show, and regretfully sends her daughter back to the US for the rest of the season to try and work out which one of the many, still alive, terrorists she’s met over the years is now trying to hurt her. She spends much of the season on the run in Germany, very Jason Bourne-esqe, and trying to understand the complications of the CIA document leak, with Allison’s Russian spy connection as well as where Saul, the CIA and Quinn stand on the issue. Her questionable ethics rise up more and more often as she puts Jonas, Otto and Quinn in difficult positions throughout the season, but ultimately Carrie does good in the end and her finale of jumping into the unknown and running through a train tunnel was absolutely compelling to watch. The season has a tight season arc, great supporting plot lines and strong female caracters throughout. It has its weaker moments; Saul is not on top form this season, his divorce from his wife has sent him tumbling into desperation at times and anger - not the usual things we associate with the calm and passionate Saul we know and love. I was disappointed at how long it took for him and Carrie to make amends and work together, rather than against each other. Poor Quinn also has a rough time this season, getting shot, injured, hospitalised and then gassed with sarin leaving him near death by season’s end :(( This season of Homeland focuses more on traditional spywork of missing documents, keeping information safe, double agents, spies and thier networks and protecting friends and communities from terror. It felt more like one big intelligence operation, from begining tp end which was arefreshing change from all the political/counter terrorism discussions about arms deals etc that most other seasons of Homeland seem to have had as subplots. Definitely my favourite season of Homeland to date, hopefully this dynamic run continues for further seasons with more exciting adventures of Carrie and co.