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The Top 5 Characters Who Appeared Only Once on Seinfeld

NBC’s Seinfeld described as " A show about nothing" relied heavily on amazing characters rather than plot, to drive the sitcom. And the show drove to some pretty crazy places, mainly due to the Jerry, Elaine, George and Kramer’s interaction with the wacky people in their New York universe. Some of these characters like Puddy, Newman, J. Peterman and Tim Whatley made several appearances; however there were some interesting guest stars that did a one off character and thus stole the show during their brief appearance. Unfortunately, they were never heard from again. Here are five of the greatest Seinfeld characters who only appeared once. READ MORE...

Jerry Seinfeld Likes All Jokes, Even Ones About the Seinfeld Finale

A very special bonus episode of Good One. ...Read More... http://www.vulture.com/2017/05/jerry-seinfeld-comedy-good-one-podcast.html?mid=full-rss-vulture

Did Steve Bannon Really Make $32 Million From Seinfeld?

(Probably not, according to The New Yorker.) ...Read More... http://www.vulture.com/2017/04/did-steve-bannon-really-make-millions-from-seinfeld.html?mid=full-rss-vulture

'Seinfeld's' Jason Alexander to Star in Audience Network Comedy 'Hit the Road'

He'll also exec produce the scripted comedy from Primary Wave Entertainment and Fabrik Entertainment. ...Read More... http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/television/~3/DPWVDJ9wjTo/seinfelds-jason-alexander-star-audience-network-comedy-hit-road-996509

The Shows That Made Us Fall in Love With TV

Valentine's Day: a time to open up a nice bottle of red wine and fall into the loving arms of your... favorite TV show. For most normals, television is an occasional treat, but for SideReel's editors, it's a true love. Like all relationships, TV can be challenging ("ugh, so many episodes of Scandal to get through") and it can disappoint (see: Homeland Season 3), but it also can delight. We're all in the throws of great romances with television that go back many years. Here are just a few examples of the series that made us fall in love with TV.     Life Goes On Among the few childhood memories I haven't blocked out is this TV-centric one: In fourth grade, we were finally allowed to pick a musical instrument to learn. A choir kid, I had longed to play music too, so I jumped at the chance and chose the saxophone. It was all so exciting: going to a music store to pay for the instrument, assembling it, figuring out how the reed worked, and finally, learning to play. And then… it was a little less exciting. A total beginner with what some would describe as a patience deficit, it was frustrating fumbling through those first few weeks of lessons. But I persevered! Until practice interfered with my totes fave TV show, Life Goes On . When I was forced to choose between spending my precious Sunday evenings learning how to make musical magic happen by blowing air through a conical brass tube or watching the Thatchers battle every serious social issue the early '90s could throw at a family dramedy, I chose television. Felicity My SideReel bio reads "University of New York, class of '02" for a reason. Felicity is my JAM. I remember being very aware of the show during the summer before it premiered. One of the big entertainment magazines included it among the fall's must-watch new series, and since it was a college drama that coincided with the start of my college drama, I made sure to check it out. And it was good, you guys. So good. It was a show about young people that treated its audience with respect. It made a star out of Keri Russell. It featured THE love triangle. It was super moody and dark — literally, the lighting was so dim — but also sometimes light and fun. You know, like college. And with J.J. Abrams, the show wasn't afraid to take storytelling risks, most of which really paid off. Yes, even the final four episodes, a hard right turn down a sci-fi path that I was living for. Happy Endings I have loved many modern, single-camera comedies, from 30 Rock and Parks and Recreation to Broad City and Catastrophe . But there's one I absolutely adore: Happy Endings . It's the best sitcom of the past 10 years, without a doubt. A highly GIFable, quotable, bingeable series that brought together the absolute perfect cast to play borderline sociopaths who are not always likable but who are completely lovable. The six friends play with 1990s sitcom tropes, but obliterate the traditional boundaries in a refreshingly modern way that still, watching them a few years later, doesn't feel dated. No show has made me laugh out loud as often as this one, and no single television moment has made me laugh as much as Penny's disastrous trip to the car dealership with Jane. The actors and creators have gone on to work on new projects of varying creative and commercial success, but #sorrynotsorry, this will be the career highlight for each.   Smallville You never forget your first. Binge, that is. Two weeks before the fourth season premiere, my family decided it was time to stop catching out-of-order reruns of Smallville and start the series from the beginning. There was no time to lose, so we bought the first three seasons on DVD and dove right in. My life became eating, breathing, and sleeping Smallville . My mother was a ruthless binge leader, watching ahead while I was at school and insisting there was no time to go back and rewatch the episodes I'd missed. We caught up with just minutes to spare before the premiere. And from then on I was hooked. I'd like to say I was in it for my nerdy love of the comic book-inspired storylines or John Glover's nuanced portrayal of Lionel Luthor, but I'm pretty sure most of the magic was generated by the potent combination of my raging 17-year-old hormones with The CW's knack for casting beautiful 30-somethings as high school kids. Tom Welling defined my taste in men for years to come — my parents even nicknamed my first boyfriend Clark Kent. Alas, from that first TV love also came my first heartbreak. What happens to a TV cancellation deferred? The show gets three too many seasons and suddenly what was once a blissful hour of my week felt like a chore. I stuck it out to the bitter end, long after the rest of my friends and family had fallen off the show. I'd like to say this first heartbreak lessened the blow of later shows that went the same way, but in all honesty, it hurt just as bad with The Office and How I Met Your Mother . (And since we're airing grudges, I still haven't forgiven the writers for not running with the Chlois theory. I ship Chlark forever.)   Seinfeld Although I was much too young to be able to fully appreciate the humor of a show about nothing, watching Seinfeld with my family has always been a fond TV memory for me. The subtleties of Jerry’s attempted deadpan delivery were almost always lost on me and I’m fairly certain I didn’t understand most of the jokes (though Elaine’s dancing is universally hilarious). But the nostalgia of my parents’ pee-pants laughter makes re-watching old episodes now even more enjoyable for me. The Sopranos Frequent TV watching was embraced rather than frowned upon while growing up in my family, but for some reason, mafia-related shows were the one off-limits genre, according to my parents. That made my going off to college and having the freedom to binge-watch The Sopranos that much more satisfying to me (thanks, SideReel!). I guess you could say it was my "gateway" show into the addictive world of premium television… and look at me now!   Full House One of the first shows I remember truly loving was Full House . I mean, what young girl wasn't obsessed with the Olsen twins in the early '90s? In fact, I'd argue that Full House profoundly impacted my life in a number of ways. First off, after moving to a new city in third grade, I learned that a girl who lived around the corner from me also loved it, so I went to her house after school one day to watch — and we're still friends nearly 25 years later. I also learned to avoid wearing vests at all costs so you don't accidentally dress like your teacher (I legit stopped wearing vests after watching that episode, at least for a few years). Lastly, I realized from an early age that, at least based on the intro and some B-roll footage, San Francisco seemed like a pretty awesome city. Guess what? I live there now and it's pretty great. (Sadly, I don't own a beautiful Victorian, though.) Thanks, Full House !   We showed you ours; now you show us yours. Which shows give you that warm and fuzzy feeling? Let us know in the comments below! div.post p { text-align: justify; }

Former NBC Execs Look Back on the Births of 'ER,' 'Seinfeld,' and 'Will & Grace'

The execs gathered Tuesday in Beverly Hills to discuss the Must See TV era of NBC. ...Read More... http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/thr/television/~3/lw4A2cL9rRY/nbc-execs-look-back-er-seinfeld-will-grace-973094

15 Quotes from Seinfeld that Are Words to Live By (PHOTOS)

The purpose of the show about nothing, aka  Seinfeld , was to hilariously depict the day-to-day lives of a small group of friends in New York and their meaningless issues. Whether you’ve seen  Seinfeld  before or not, these 15 super relatable quotes will make you laugh and say, “same.”   ...Read More... http://feeds.wetpaint.com/~r/wetpaint/latest/excerpt/~3/99GxS02MVFk/

How Steve Bannon Made a Fortune Off of Seinfeld

Steve Bannon, Donald Trumps new chief advisor, becameone of the most prominent figures in American media by leading Breitbart, a conservative-leaning news site that critics call sexist, antisemitic, homophobic and racist. Hes less well-known forhisunique role in the history of the TV series Seinfeld. Long before he became the chief strategist ofDonald Trumps White House and the executive chairman of Breitbart News, Bannon was an investment banker. After a stint at Goldman Sachs, he launched his own firm, Bannon &Co., in 1990.  ...Read More... http://www.thewrap.com/steve-bannon-seinfeld/

Jerry Seinfeld Turned Down Offer to Do Live Seinfeld Revival Episode

Has Larry Davids recent decision to bring back Curb Your Enthusiasm inspired Jerry Seinfeld to revive his eponymous 90s sitcom? The short answer: No! not that theres anything wrong with that. In a new interview, thecomedian revealed that he has previously turned down an offer tobring back Seinfeldfor a live episode that would have [] http://tvline.com/2016/08/12/seinfeld-revival-jerry-seinfeld-offered-live-reunion-episode/

'Seinfeld' spec script imagines how the gang would react to 9/11

Seinfeld epitomizes life in New York City, but its 9-season run came to an end before theSept. 11 terrorist attacks shook the Big Apple. Now, comedian Billy Domineau is imagining how Jerry, George, Elaine, and Kramer would have reacted to the tragedy (hint: very selfishly). Domineaus...   Read More... http://feeds.ew.com/~r/entertainmentweekly/tv/coverage/~3/QM14PzVTGlo/seinfeld-spec-script-september-11-attacks