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'NYC Prep' Continues to Attract Bad Press


Just a couple of episodes in, NYC Prep has already earned quite a nasty reputation, especially among prep schoolers, their parents and reputable schools in Manhattan. The show that follows six teenagers as they attend weekend parties, shopping sprees, charity events and dinner parties as part of the elite high school scene has been described as "absolute garbage" and "like a bad Dynasty episode"


Many other members of the New York City private school community have stated that the experiences shown on the show are not similar to how life actually is for most Upper East Siders. However, Liz Alderman, a supervising producer of NYC Prep, explains that the show is not about the schools and that the producers were careful not to mention their names. Evidently, the schools took care of that by releasing public statements.


"It was our intention from the beginning to keep the schools out of it," Alderman said in a statement from her publicist. "So it's a little ironic that they succeeded in doing what we went to great pains to avoid."


While all references to the names of the schools the students attend have been edited out by the producers, word has quickly surfaced they are the Nightingale-Bamford School, the Dwight School, the Birch Wathen Lenox School, the Ross School in East Hampton, and Stuyvesant High School, the only public school on the list.


Meanwhile the private schools' administrators have made their disappointment public.


"The Nightingale-Bamford School has no affiliation with the Bravo television program 'NYC Prep,' and we strongly disagree with how it seeks to portray independent school students in New York," Sue Mathews, the director of institutional advancement, said in a statement. "One of our students decided to participate in the show without consulting Nightingale's administrators."


Stephen H. Spahn, the chancellor of Dwight, followed up with a statement of his own, saying in part, "We always counsel our students to avoid such opportunities, as they usually reflect wrong-headed stereotypes."


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