Review: Jodie Foster directs a powerful Mel Gibson in strange, emotional 'The Beaver'

Jodie Foster has been part of film as long as I've been paying attention.  She's eight years older than I am, so by the time I was paying attention to movies at all, she was already working and familiar and established, a regular guest star on every show on TV, it seemed.  I saw her in movies like "Tom Sawyer" and "Bugsy Malone" and "Freaky Friday," and once I got a little bit older, I started seeing her in other films like "Taxi Driver" and "The Little Girl Who Lived Down The Lane" and "Foxes" and "Carny," and she was constantly working with interesting people and on interesting films, and she seemed like an adult from the moment she stepped in front of a camera, no matter how old she was.  Once she started directing, it seemed like a natural step, and "Little Man Tate" is a lovely debut movie, sweet but not sentimental, shot through with deep feeling and a love of performance.  Then four years later, she returned to it with "Home For The Holidays."  And then…

Sixteen years.  That's a huge layoff between movies.  Not by choice, either.  She's had false starts and dead ends.   She's produced movies for other people.  She's acted.  She's stayed involved.  But until now, she's been silent as a director, and her return to the job made its premiere tonight at the SXSW Film Festival in Austin, Texas.  It was one of the last two films I saw at the fest, and I did my best to walk into it cold, without any sense of what I was going to see.  I've never watched the trailer for the film, and I saw one poster for it at the Summit offices last year, before Comic-Con.  At that point, Summit seemed very happy with the movie, confident that they had something special on their hands. Read More...


http://www.hitfix.com/blogs/motion-captured/posts/review-jodie-foster-directs-a-powerful-mel-gibson-in-strange-emotional-the-beaver

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