Review of Rick and Morty

Sundays, 11:30 PM ET on Adult Swim

30 minutes

Mad scientist Rick Sanchez moves in with his daughter's family after disappearing for 20 years and involves them in his wacky adventures in this animated comedy.
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Oct 15, 2017 8:43AM EDT
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When you hear of an animated show you tend to think that it's another family Guy or The Simpsons with cheap and low standards. Yet, Rick and Morty is far away of being pigeon-holed in that category. This show is the result of a hilarious mixture of wittiness, comedy, sci-fi, nihilism and action, nonetheless, what makes this show one of the top 10 rated TV shows is the absolutely clever writing and the well-designed character personalities, besides that, it might not be a series to watch as a family. Additionally, Rick and Morty is plenty of cultural references such as Back to the Future, Inception, Total recall, The Purge, among many others.

The plot is quite simple; it consists on the title characters, Rick Sanchez, a genius alcoholic and amoral super scientist, and his grandson and sidekick Morty Smith, a 14 year old anxious boy who is not as smart as his grandfather, alternating between their domestic lives and going on an endless amount of adventures exploring the infinite multiverse, running into trouble and generating chaos. However, there is a rich enough set of characters to provide ample space. Unlike many other cartoons that have a sub plot in every episode, the ones in this show are actually relevant and memorable, reaching to the point where it's complicated to distinguish between the main and sub plot.

Leaving aside the comic part, each episode surprisingly leaves a strong message and gets to discuss certain topics such as how we treat animals, religion, racism and feminism. But what the series principally highlights is the nihilistic philosophy: existence means nothing and we are not special at all, applying the cosmological principle to the utmost. So it is that Rick leads himself to a hedonistic life and chooses to live going on adventures and giving himself to science.

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