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Movie Review: ‘The Inbetweeners,’ Directed by Ben Palmer

The teenage characters of a popular British TV sitcom take their antics to the big screen in "The Inbetweeners." //movies.nytimes.com/2012/09/07/movies/the-inbetweeners-directed-by-ben-palmer.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

The Inbetweeners: ''The Camping Trip'' Review Season 3, Episode 6

Beware - this is an early review of tonight's episode of The Inbetweeners, and contains mild spoilers. So don't say we didn't warn you! So that's that then. Every rite of passage ever suffered by an awkward male teenager, condensed into 18 neat, 22-minute episodes. Over three series of The Inbetweeners, we've suffered sex (or something like it), drugs (via a Rizla full of powdered tea) and rock 'n' roll (well, a crappy mosh pit, anyway). We've endured gallons of every possible fluid the human body is capable of emitting. Girlfriends and handjobs have come and gone, but Will, Simon, Jay and Neil have finally reached the brink of manhood. And guess what? It's still just as sh*t as being a poxy teenager. Brilliant. To Read More  Click Here .

The Inbetweeners: ''Will Is Home Alone'' Review Season 3, Episode 5

If you believe what the cast say and accept that this is the penultimate episode of The Inbetweeners - and, let's face it, another series' worth of sixth-form antics would be a little creepy at their advancing ages - then we must hope that Will, Simon, Jay and Neil are planning to leave school with a bang. Literally. We know one of them gets their end away this series, so until then, we're left with an episode that's mostly filler, and thanks to Jay's psychotic squirrel murder, only a little killer. To Read More  Click Here .

The Inbetweeners: ''Will Is Home Alone'' Review Season 3, Episode 5

If you believe what the cast say and accept that this is the penultimate episode of The Inbetweeners - and, let's face it, another series' worth of sixth-form antics would be a little creepy at their advancing ages - then we must hope that Will, Simon, Jay and Neil are planning to leave school with a bang. Literally. We know one of them gets their end away this series, so until then, we're left with an episode that's mostly filler, and thanks to Jay's psychotic squirrel murder, only a little killer. To Read More Click Here . If You Missed This Episode Watch It Here Online Now

The Inbetweeners: ''The Trip to Warwick'' Review

Sex. Now that I've got your attention, let's talk about this latest adventure of The Inbetweeners, the crudest, rudest and funniest episode of the series so far. It's all about the pursuit - and the eventual attainment - of the physical act of love, but the boys have different ideas on how sex should work... Simon, the lucky lad who'll soon make the acquaintance of the beast with two backs, looks to the other boys for advice after his suggestion of making love in the bushes is rejected by girlfriend Tara. Will doesn't want Simon to have sex at all, so he can get his friend back; Jay takes the opportunity to go into biological detail about the female anatomy; Neil just offers his extensive fingering advice. The solution is... well, a little convoluted. Rather than do what any randy teens would do and just wait for their parents to go out, Simon and Tara trek up to her sister's student house at Warwick University, where Simon can work on his dirty talk ("I want to f*** your f***ing fanny off, you t***!") and finally seal the deal. Unfortunately, sitcom rules dictate your idiot mates have to come along for the ride too, otherwise it'd be a short episode - and a lot less funny. To Read More  Click Here .

The Inbetweeners: ''The Trip to Warwick'' Review

Sex. Now that I've got your attention, let's talk about this latest adventure of The Inbetweeners, the crudest, rudest and funniest episode of the series so far. It's all about the pursuit - and the eventual attainment - of the physical act of love, but the boys have different ideas on how sex should work... Simon, the lucky lad who'll soon make the acquaintance of the beast with two backs, looks to the other boys for advice after his suggestion of making love in the bushes is rejected by girlfriend Tara. Will doesn't want Simon to have sex at all, so he can get his friend back; Jay takes the opportunity to go into biological detail about the female anatomy; Neil just offers his extensive fingering advice. The solution is... well, a little convoluted. Rather than do what any randy teens would do and just wait for their parents to go out, Simon and Tara trek up to her sister's student house at Warwick University, where Simon can work on his dirty talk ("I want to f*** your f***ing fanny off, you t***!") and finally seal the deal. Unfortunately, sitcom rules dictate your idiot mates have to come along for the ride too, otherwise it'd be a short episode - and a lot less funny. To Read More Click Here . If You Missed This Episode Watch It Here Online Now

The Inbetweeners "The Gig and the Girlfriend" Review

Assuming you've been an 'inbetweener' at some point in your school life, there's a moment you'll no doubt remember vividly that's captured brilliantly in this week's episode of The Inbetweeners. Cast your mind back... You've spent years getting the measure of girls: what to say, how to act around them, things you're expected to do once you get them into bed, and so on. Only, suddenly, now you're at an age where you're expected to know about drugs to look cool. And by 'know about', we mean, 'pretend to know about'. To Read More Click Here . If You Missed This Episode Watch It Here Online Now

The Inbetweeners: "The Fashion Show" Review Season 3, Episode 1

Most American 'high school' comedies suffer from 'thirtysomething screenwriter syndrome', wherein pre-pubescent kids spout acerbic one-liners with the kind of rapier wit usually reserved for... well, thirtysomething screenwriters. That's where E4's British comedy The Inbetweeners, back for its third series, is different. The humour, far from being advanced beyond its young stars' years, is endearingly puerile. Sometimes, even the most cutting put-downs can't compare to being loudly called a "massive twat" in front of your mates, and that's something almost everyone who was educated at a comprehensive school can relate to. The abject horror of being labelled a "bender" because you pierced the wrong ear or wore the wrong clothes or profess a liking for the wrong band is not one that goes away until well into adulthood. To Read More Click Here . If You Missed This Episode Watch It Here Online Now

THE INBETWEENERS (BBC America) Review

BBC America is debuting back to back episodes of a fantastic new show called THE INBETWEENERS on Monday January 25th at 9 PM ET/PT. After the debut, the show will air on its regular day and time on Wednesdays at 9:30 PM onBBC America. The first episode is about the main character, 16 year old Will McKenzie's, first day at a new school following the divorce of his parents. Will isn't like the other kids in this suburban public school and he gets made fun of immediately for sporting a brief case. Determined to not fall into the nerd clique, Will basically stalks some of the other guys in his year until they let him hang out with them. Will and his 3 new friends (Simon, Jay and Neil) are neither the coolest kids nor the nerdiest - hence "The Inbetweeners". In Episode 1, Will tries to fit in by ordering beer for his friends at a pub. When his plans backfire he manages to make enemies out of his whole school, as well as the head of his 6 form. What makes matters worse for Will is everyone seems to think that his mom is a total hottie. What a bad way to start off the year. I think teenagers will love The Inbetweeners because it is instantly relatable. Adults will love it as well because it's actually very funny. Although it's a British show, I think it translates to the American audience very well. There isn't much British slang in episode 1, and I was able to figure out most of it based on the context of the conversation. I think fans of such shows as "How I Met Your Mother" and "Family Guy" might appreciate the humor of The Inbetweeners. I also got the chance to check out episode 2 tonight and you are not going to want to miss it. What starts as an innocent plot to get girls, end with a disabled girl getting hit in the face with a Frisbee. Not to be mean or insensitive or whatever, but do I really need to give you more reasons to check it out? Episode 2 is about the boys bunking off school and getting in all sorts of mischief together. For example, does anybody know what a 'bumder' is? You will be the end of episode 2. Watching this show reminds me how similar teenagers are around the world. Even though England is half a world away, young boys still want to skip school and get drunk like they do in America. Some things are just universal I guess. The writing on Inbetweeners is fantastic, and one of the many reasons why I love the show. The show's writers (Iain Morris and Damon Beesley) seem to have a winner on their hands. It wouldn't be their first time. Morris and Beesley have also written 2 episodes of Flight of the Conchords, and chances are if you are a fan of FOTC, you will appreciate The Inbetweeners. They are both are filled with cringe-worthy laughs and unforgettable characters. Another thing that I love about The Inbetweeners, and most other British shows for that matter, is that the characters are normal looking, and the show isn't over produced. Remember to check out The Inbetweeners Monday January 25th at 9 PM on BBC America. Real characters, plenty of laughs, violence against the mentally handicapped, seriously people, what are you waiting for? Source here

The Inbetweeners - Review

Although BBC America has found that certain genres travel better than others, the humiliation of teenage adolescence is apparently pretty universal. Enter "The Inbetweeners," a coming-of-age comedy that's culturally specific only in its idioms (attractive females are "fit") about a quartet of randy boys, as seen through the eyes of a new arrival at a public high school. Crude yet breezy, the series has plenty of awkward charm, if precious little to separate itself from the countless yarns of this variety that came before it. Being a teenage boy is all about unwanted and ill-timed erections, embarrassing parents, trying to get laid (or barring that, lying about it), avoiding bullies and hoping nobody notices that you're Australian on that fake ID you've acquired in order to buy beer. Bespectacled Will (Simon Bird) is the new kid, and in the premiere he falls in with a group of near-losers: Simon (Joe Thomas), who has a huge crush on long-time friend Carli (Emily Head); Jay (James Buckley), who constantly boasts about his fictional sexual conquests; and Neil (Blake Harrison), a near-moron who, memorably, winds up having his clothes stolen at a theme park. As if to underscore the timelessness of these situations, some of the gags could have been plucked almost directly out of "The Summer of '42," and the half-dozen episodes are uneven -- the funniest being the second, when Simon gets drunk to marshal enough courage for what turns out to be a disastrous trip to Carli's house. Writers Damon Beesley and Iain Morris (whose credits include "Flight of the Conchords") go for a lot of big, obvious, bodily fluid-oriented jokes, but they also develop the characters as they gradually introduce their parents, from Will's uncomfortably "fit" mom (Belinda Stewart-Wilson) to Neil's dad (Alex Macqueen), who everyone assumes to be gay. If "Skins" was British TV's dark, "Kids"-like look at the youth experience, "Inbetweeners" is closer to "Freaks and Geeks" territory, with Bird as a sort of latter-day Woody Allen, constantly trying to talk his way out of a beating or into a bedroom. (He has his shots at the latter, but generally botches them miserably.) The show has already received considerable acclaim in the U.K. (including the 2008 British Comedy Award), a level of praise that seems a bit generous; still, in the long continuum of teen comedies, "Inbetweeners" does qualitatively register toward the high end of the scale. Source Here